Brooklyn Boro

November 2: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

November 2, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1901, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Announcement was made today by General Superintendent Wheatley of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company that on election night the cars of that company, instead of running through Washington street, would be sent down Adams street, so as to permit the crowds of people to line up in the street and watch the bulletins showing the election returns in front of the Eagle office. The cars of the Coney Island and Brooklyn Railroad Company will be sent to the bridge via Jay street, and the trolleys of both the Coney Island and Brooklyn and the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Companies will come up from the bridge via Fulton street.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1903, the Eagle reported, “Fusion confidence came up with a bound today and at all the anti-Tammany headquarters today [Seth] Low’s election and that of his associates is predicted even by the doubters of last week. It is the talk of the hour, the only apprehension being that in some way Tammany will manage to steal the election. While a large plurality is considered improbable, the prediction is for a safe margin. Twenty thousand in the city is the figure most commonly mentioned. The danger of a victory being stolen is causing the Fusion mangers much apprehension. Five hundred lawyers have been asked to help the Low forces to see that the law is enforced. Repeating gangs have been found all over town, and the lodging houses are filled to the brim. The campaign managers have the names and descriptions of hundreds of men who are registered in several places, and also of men who are intending to do a wholesale repeating business on other people’s names. For this reason they urge citizens to vote early, so that they will not be shut out by some bums from the Bowery. The floaters usually make their rounds early in the afternoon, when they are told what names they can vote under to advantage.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1909, the Eagle reported, “An unwieldy ballot and complex political sentiment made voting very slow in Brooklyn today. Voters took more time in casting their ballots than they did a year ago, when they first wrestled with the new law requiring signatures. In some cases voters remained fifteen minutes in booths, although the law entitled them to only five minutes while other voters were waiting. The slow voting could hardly be regarded as an indication of a light vote. It indicated rather that voters were struggling not only with a ballot twice as wide as the booth, but with that other serious difficulty of splitting the ticket to fit the varied preferences in each individual case. Old-time politicians predicted that there would be more split ballots counted in Brooklyn tonight than ever before.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “Mayor John F. Hylan is sitting as a committing magistrate in the Flatbush Police Court this afternoon and taking testimony preparatory to court procedure to fix criminal blame for the Brighton Beach line accident last night. He will subpoena eyewitnesses of the tragedy, officials of the B.R.T. and all others who may have any knowledge of the affair. The proceeding is unique in that it is the first time that a mayor of New York City ever exercised the power he has to sit as a judge in a magistrate’s court. The Charter gives the mayor power to act as a sitting magistrate in a criminal procedure, and it is by this authority that he has taken action. The action of the mayor is with the view primarily to establish criminal blame. The mayor left his office at City Hall for Flatbush shortly after 12 o’clock noon, announcing that he would open court in the Snyder Avenue Magistrate’s Court at 1 o’clock. Mr. Hylan took with him the corporation counsel, several assistant corporation counsels and a squad of detectives. The detectives will round up witnesses. The object of the hearing, it was stated, would be to gather evidence which could be presented to the Grand Jury for the purpose of seeking criminal indictments.”

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k.d. lang
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
David Schwimmer
Andy Kropa/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include political commentator Pat Buchanan, who was born in 1938; golfer Dave Stockton, who was born in 1941; “Hart to Hart” star Stefanie Powers, who was born in 1942; Pro Football Hall of Famer Larry Little, who was born in 1945; singer-songwriter J.D. Souther, who was born in 1945; “Dewey Defeats Truman” author Thomas Mallon, who was born in 1951; “Right Back Where We Started From” singer Maxine Nightingale, who was born in 1952; former National League MVP Willie McGee, who was born in 1958; “Constant Craving” singer k.d. lang, who was born in 1961; “Friends” star David Schwimmer, who was born in 1966; and “Riverdale” star Marisol Nichols, who was born in 1973.

Larry Little
Wilfredo Lee/AP

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BREAKING NEWS: The first commercial radio station went on the air on this day in 1920 when KDKA of Pittsburgh broadcast the results of the U.S. presidential election. The station got its license to broadcast on Nov. 7, 1921. By 1922 there were about 400 licensed radio stations in the U.S.

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TOP GUN: The mammoth flying boat Hercules made its only trip on this day in 1947. Designed, built and flown by Howard Hughes, the 200-ton plywood craft — nicknamed the “Spruce Goose” — was the world’s largest airplane at the time. It flew for about one mile at an altitude of 70 feet over Long Beach Harbor, Cal.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“I was happy in the midst of dangers and inconveniences.”

— frontiersman Daniel Boone, who was born on this day in 1734


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