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October 12: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 12, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1892, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “And now, when it would seem that all had been done that could be done, to give honor to the name and perpetuate the glorious deeds of Columbus the discoverer, the city of New York, reflecting but the national expression, commemorates the heroism of four hundred years ago by a military parade, the like of which for magnitude, for splendor and for patriotic sentiment has never been surpassed. The host that marched the streets of New York this morning represented the mighty army, militia and marine service of the United States, the Grand Army of the Republic, the fire departments and the civic societies of New York and surrounding cities … The ceremonies of the day were inaugurated at sunrise. From half a hundred church towers the glad chimes rang out a welcome to the anniversary day, and arising in tintinabulous melody above the awakening city gave all mankind within hearing a musical invitation to partake in the festivities of the day. Loudest of all spoke old Trinity’s bells in patriotic rhythmical note, and early as was the hour, there were hundreds who stood in the street, gazing at the weather stained-tower until the last faint echo died away.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “CLEVELAND — The Cleveland Indians beat the Brooklyn Superbas today and with the game won the world’s baseball championship. The score was 3 to 0. Mixed up with bad breaks against the Brooklyn team were timely hitting by the Indians and poor baseball on the part of the National Leaguers.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “Brooklyn was certain of its Civic Center today and it had an enthusiastic mandate from the Board of Estimate to proceed with a stately War Memorial to rise on Cadman Plaza as an integral part of the center. The board unanimously gave the green light to the borough’s long-cherished desire to have a front door worthy of its size and civic pride at a meeting yesterday which: 1. Authorized the widening of Adams St., key to the center, to form an impressive 160-foot boulevard leading from the Brooklyn Bridge. 2. Approved various map changes in the area, including creation of an 8-acre superblock which will be the site of a $5,000,000 bank housing project. 3. Agreed to the building and maintenance of the memorial to Brooklyn’s 324,000 men and women in the armed forces, which will be erected by the citizens of the borough through public subscription of $1,500,000.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “The battle for new schools shared top place with city job reforms today as the foremost planks in the platform of three of the four top candidates in the forthcoming race for mayor. Both Rudolph Halley, Liberal-Independent candidate, and Robert F. Wagner, the Democratic nominee, deplored the present school conditions in speeches yesterday and called for a $500,000,000 building program. Rats and falling plaster, Wagner said, are no uncommon sights today in New York City’s school buildings. Of 881 now in use, he declared, 170 are ‘antiquated firetraps.’ Halley hit the overcrowding of students and pointed out that 10 percent of all the elementary school children in the city are on short or split session, and thus receiving only a partial education. New York State was slammed by both candidates for bearing a major part of the blame. Wagner charged the state was robbing the city of $35,000,000 a year by ‘juggling the state-aid formula.’ In another statement yesterday, Harold Riegelman, Republican candidate for mayor, proposed a ‘wholly new approach’ to the city’s employee relations problems by creating a new Department of Personnel. Riegelman said he could end the ‘spoils’ system by letting the new department, which would be headed by an expert, take the recruitment and examination functions of the Civil Service Commission.”

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Charlie Ward
David J. Phillip/AP
Hugh Jackman
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former N.Y. Yankees shortstop Tony Kubek, who was born in 1935; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Sam Moore (Sam & Dave), who was born in 1935; TV anchor Chris Wallace, who was born in 1947; actress and model Susan Anton, who was born in 1950; Tesla singer Jeff Keith, who was born in 1958; “24” star Carlos Bernard, who was born in 1962; “Valley Girl” star Deborah Foreman, who was born in 1962; “X-Men” star Hugh Jackman, who was born in 1968; former NFL defensive tackle Leon Lett, who was born in 1968; “Growing Pains” star Kirk Cameron, who was born in 1970; former N.Y. Knicks point guard Charlie Ward, who was born in 1970; “The Sandlot” star Tom Guiry, who was born in 1981; and “Roswell, New Mexico” star Tyler Blackburn, who was born in 1986.

Carlos Bernard
Chris Pizzello/AP

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EXECUTIVE DECISION: President Theodore Roosevelt officially renamed the Executive Mansion “the White House” on this day in 1901. At various times it had also been known as the “President’s Palace” and the “President’s House.” Every president since John Adams has lived in the building at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington, D.C.

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FEATS OF CLAY: Art Clokey was born 100 years ago today. The stop-motion clay animation pioneer is best known as the creator of Gumby and his horse Pokey, who first appeared on the “Howdy Doody Show” before starring in their own series. He also co-created “Davey and Goliath,” which was funded by the Lutheran Church in America. He died in 2010.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“So there’s an attraction that we have to beauty that is innate. But sadly I think the pressure young girls are up against now is incredibly unhealthy.”

— actress and model Susan Anton, who was born on this day in 1950

Eagle file photo


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