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October 6: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 6, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “CARLISLE, PA. — Mrs. Samuel Sipe, who was a child friend of Molly Pitcher and a resident of Carlisle for ninety-four years, celebrated her 101st birthday here yesterday. She recalls Molly Pitcher, the heroine of Monmouth, and refutes the assertion that she is buried in any other place than in Carlisle, where memorials have been placed over the woman’s grave.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1932, the Eagle reported, “The New York Court of Appeals held today that a mayoralty election must be held in New York City this fall. The controversy reached the Court of Appeals on an appeal by David McAdams, a friend of Acting Mayor Joseph McKee, from an order of the Appellate Division reversing the action of Supreme Court Justice John E. McGeehan, who had granted a motion for a writ of mandamus to restrain the New York City Board of Elections from holding a mayoralty election on Nov. 8 next, the day of the annual general election. There was no written opinion in the case. A few words, typewritten, on onion skin paper, formally informed the waiting crowd of newspapermen and attorneys of the decision of the court … McAdams’ proceedings was a taxpayer’s action, and was based on the contention that McKee had succeeded to the entire unexpired term to which Mayor [Jimmy] Walker was elected and that the Greater New York Charter forbade mayoralty elections in years in which a general state election was held. The City Charter, it was contended, was special legislation and superseded all general statutes that might otherwise apply … The Board of Elections and the chairman of both the Democratic and Socialist political organizations in the counties comprising the greater city, through their counsel, J. Joseph Lilly, John Godfrey Saxe and Morris Hillquitt, maintained that the mayor of New York was a constitutional officer, that the state Constitution provides for elections to fill vacancies on the election day next succeeding the happening of the vacancy, and that there was nothing in the New York Charter to forbid such an election. Six of the seven judges concurred in the opinion.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Supreme Court reassembles today for a new term that is expected to bring significant decisions on the Taft-Hartley Law and basic civil liberties. Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson starts his second term as presiding jurist as resolute as ever to maintain peace among his erstwhile rowing colleagues. No hint of the deep-seated personal quarrels bubbled to the surface last year. The court opens its 158th year with 400 cases already on the docket. A handful raise fringe issues under the new labor law. Other new cases demand interpretations of civil liberties assured by the Constitution’s Bill of Rights. The court must rule on efforts of racial minorities to overthrow private home-zoning agreements; systematic exclusion of Negroes from state juries; the line between freedom of the press and libelous comment and the teaching of religion in public schools.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “BOSTON — The Weather Man, changing his mind for the fourth time in 24 hours, finally came up with a forecast of fairly clear weather today, giving the nod for the opening game of the 1948 World Series. There’ll be nothing worse than a possible sprinkle and temperatures in the 50s, he promised, so the Boston Braves, champions of the National League, and the Cleveland Indians, who gained the American League title in a play-off thriller with the Red Sox in this town on Monday, will go to work on each other at 1 p.m. Both managers plan to lead with their pitching aces. That means Billy Southworth, veteran chieftain of the Braves, has nominated Johnny Sain to start the ball game and that Lou Boudreau, boss-shortstop of the Cleveland club, will call upon rapid Robert Feller … This, incidentally, is Cleveland’s first World Series since 1920, when the Indians beat the Dodgers, five games to two.”

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Addison Rae
Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP
Tony Dungy
Ron Schwane/Pool/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Joanie Loves Chachi” star Ellen Travolta, who was born in 1939; “The Wicker Man” star Britt Ekland, who was born in 1942; Super Soaker inventor Lonnie Johnson, who was born in 1949; The Commodores co-founder Thomas McClary, who was born in 1949; REO Speedwagon singer Kevin Cronin, who was born in 1951; Los Lobos co-founder David Hidalgo, who was born in 1954; Pro Football Hall of Famer Tony Dungy, who was born in 1955; bowling and horseshoes legend Walter Ray Williams Jr., who was born in 1959; “Adventures in Babysitting” star Elisabeth Shue, who was born in 1963; former N.Y. Yankees outfielder Ruben Sierra, who was born in 1965; “NYPD Blue” star Jacqueline Obradors, who was born in 1966; “Fantastic 4” star Ioan Gruffudd, who was born in 1973; “Mighty Morphin Power Rangers” star Amy Jo Johnson, who was born in 1970; Basketball Hall of Famer and former N.Y. Liberty center Rebecca Lobo, who was born in 1973; “Suburgatory” star Jeremy Sisto, who was born in 1974; and social medial personality Addison Rae, who was born in 2000.

Rebecca Lobo
Stephan Savoia/AP

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CENTURY MARK: Joseph Lowery was born 100 years ago today. The Alabama native and United Methodist minister co-founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference with Martin Luther King Jr. and others. Known as the “Dean of the Civil Rights Movement,” he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. He died in 2020.

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A VIOLENT END: Anwar Sadat was assassinated on this day in 1981. The Egyptian president and Nobel Peace Prize recipient was killed in Cairo while reviewing a military parade commemorating the 1973 Egyptian-Israeli War. At least eight other people were killed in the attack. Sadat was succeeded by Hosni Mubarak.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“If you don’t know where you come from, it’s difficult to determine where you are. It’s even more difficult to plan where you’re going.”

— civil rights leader Joseph Lowery, who was born on this day in 1921


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