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October 4, ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 4, 2021 Brooklyn Daily Eagle
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ON THIS DAY IN 1909, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Merely as an appetizer before undertaking his heavy work late in the afternoon, Wilbur Wright drove his aeroplane on a twenty-one mile flight above the Hudson River to Grant’s Tomb and beyond, encircling that monument and returning to his starting point on Governor’s Island in 33 minutes and 33 seconds. The running was unofficial in the sense that it was not officially timed or officially announced by the Hudson-Fulton aeronautic committee, but Mr. Wright says it fulfills every condition of his contract that requires only an extended flight of half an hour’s duration. This afternoon’s flight will be official, and will be announced by signal flags and bombs. It will take place about 3 or 4 o’clock. Mr. Wright announces that it will take place anyhow, but says he will be governed by weather conditions in making his start. If the wind appears to be dropping at 3 o’clock, he will wait, but if it appears to be increasing, he will start on scheduled time.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “The World Series starts today. The baseball championship of this green footstool opens up in the Bronx at 1 p.m. as the Giants and the Yankees clash. The Dodgers are shut out, beaten in a real heartbreaker in the sudden-death third game of the playoff series at the Polo Grounds that decided the National League pennant winner. This was the first pennant for the Giants in 14 years. The Yankees, winners of the American League championship for the third straight time, have been sitting back since Sunday night, waiting for the two teams that tied over the National League schedule to finish their incredible feud. It was certainly one of the great sports stories of all time that was climaxed with one out in the last half of the ninth inning when Bobby Thomson, the Scottish-born third baseman of the Giants, slugged a home run into the left field stands at the Polo Grounds off Ralph Branca. The blow converted a 4 to 2 deficit against the Giants into a 5 to 4 victory for the club that had come back after having trailed at one stage of the race by 13 1/2 games … The Yankees, shooting for their third consecutive world championship, are quoted as 8 to 5 favorites to win the first game and 9 to 5 to win the Series.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “Registration for the five-way mayoralty election opens tomorrow and runs through Saturday and Board of Election officials are prepared for a 2,500,000 enrollment, which would set a record for a ‘normal’ municipal election. Polls will be open Monday through Friday from 3:30 to 10:30 p.m. — an hour and a half longer than in previous years — and on Saturday from 7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. By the end of the week political observers will have an answer to the question which has been bothering them since Primary Day: Will the apathy reflected in the surprisingly small Democratic primary vote be carried over into the general election on Nov. 3?”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “CLEVELAND (U.P.) — The New York Giants knocked the props out from under more people than just the Cleveland Indians. The four-game sweep of the World Series meant a loss of nearly one million dollars here since the fifth game was not played. The chief sufferers were the baseball club, the hotels and restaurants. Fifth-game receipts would have totaled some $500,000. That’s what the Cleveland team will have to return to disappointed Indian fans. The baseball team said there were two ways fans could get their fifth-game tickets redeemed. They may go in person to any branch of the Central National Bank in Cleveland or mail the ticket to the Cleveland Baseball Co., World Series Department, Cleveland Stadium, Cleveland 14, Ohio. But fans living in the vicinity had the chance to go to the Ice Capades instead. The Cleveland arena said it would accept fifth-game tickets on a dollar-for-dollar exchange for tickets to the ice show.”

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Melissa Benoist
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Jon Secada
Greg Allen/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include N.Y. Giants legend and Pro Football Hall of Famer Sam Huff, who was born in 1934; former N.Y. Rangers left wing Vic Hadfield, who was born in 1940; “The Vampire Chronicles” author Anne Rice, who was born in 1941; Baseball Hall of Famer Tony La Russa, who was born in 1944; “Amen” star Clifton Davis, who was born in 1945; Oscar-winning actress Susan Sarandon, who was born in 1946; Triumph drummer and singer Gil Moore, who was born in 1953; “Coach” star Bill Fagerbakke, who was born in 1957; “Just Another Day” singer Jon Secada, who was born in 1961; “The Omen” star Liev Schreiber, who was born in 1967; former N.Y. Knicks forward Kurt Thomas, who was born in 1972; “Clueless” star Alicia Silverstone, who was born in 1976; “She’s All That” star Rachel Leigh Cook, who was born in 1979; “Supergirl” star Melissa Benoist, who was born in 1988; and “Fifty Shades of Grey” star Dakota Johnson, who was born in 1989.

Sam Huff
Bill Kostroun/AP

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DETECTIVE COMICS: “Dick Tracy” debuted on this day in 1931. Chester Gould’s comic strip about the square-jawed detective first appeared in the Detroit Daily Mirror as “Plainclothes Tracy.” The character has also appeared on radio, TV and film, battling arch-villains Pruneface, Pearshape, Flattop, Breathless Mahoney and many others.

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NUCLEAR FAMILY: “Leave it to Beaver” premiered on this day in 1957. The sitcom about a stereotypical American family starred Jerry Mathers as Theodore “Beaver” Cleaver, Tony Dow as his brother Wally, and Hugh Beaumont and Barbara Billingsley as their parents Ward and June. The series ended on Sept. 12, 1963 but its popularity in syndication led to the 1980s sequel “Still the Beaver.”

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“You can run on a football field but you can’t hide out there.”

— former N.Y. Giants linebacker Sam Huff, who was born on this day in 1934

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