Brooklyn Boro

September 16: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 16, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Turned down on the one hand by his Board of Aldermen and on the other by the federal government, Mayor [Fiorello] LaGuardia late yesterday cast about almost hopelessly for funds with which to feed New York’s 400,000 jobless, needy families. And while it seemed that nothing short of a miracle, comparable to Biblical loaves and fishes, would solve the harassed mayor’s dilemma, he declared he was determined to find a way out. ‘There will be no starvation while I am the mayor of New York,’ he said. … Friday, when the Board of Aldermen reported back to committee the mayor’s gross business income tax, with which he hoped to raise a $50,000,000 poor relief fund, [it was] immediately announced that no more checks would be mailed out. Within the hour, William Hodson, commissioner of public welfare, ordered all payments stopped — affecting upward of 1,000,000 New Yorkers. Saturday, in desperation, the mayor petitioned Harry L. Hopkins, federal administrator of relief funds, in the hope of obtaining the government’s share of 50 percent in advance of any relief expenditures by the city. Hopkins told him such a plan was impossible. Under the present arrangement, $17,500,000 is spent each month. Of that amount, the federal government reimburses the city 50 percent; the state 25 percent; the remainder is paid from municipal funds.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “Mayor [Vincent] Impellitteri today promised more cops — and more of them ‘back on the beat’ — in an effort to cope with the rising tide of crime in the city. Heeding the pleas of Brooklynites for additional foot patrolmen throughout the borough, the mayor reported that ‘wherever possible,’ only one cop will ride a prowl car instead of the usual two. The other will be released for foot patrol duty, he indicated. Impellitteri promised that 400 policemen will be added to the force Oct. 1. He said a greater number were needed but that he is doing ‘all he could’ under budget limitations. ‘The more cops we have, the safer the streets will be,’ the mayor asserted. He has been gravely concerned with the crime problems in the city, he said, and has held several conferences with department heads and other city aides on the question. In these conferences, he declared, particular attention has been paid to the problem of protecting women against assaults. Even while the mayor was discussing the crime situation, a brazen bandit team staged a daylight bank robbery in the busy Hub section of the Bronx, fleeing with $15,000 from a Manufacturers Trust Company branch.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “Rolling up an overwhelming margin despite a primary day turnout that fell under even the most conservative estimates, Manhattan Borough President Robert F. Wagner Jr. won the Democratic nomination for mayor by a 2-to-1 landslide over Mayor [Vincent] Impellitteri. With all returns in, Wagner had polled 350,474 votes to Impellitteri’s 181,295. He carried the four biggest boroughs and lost Staten Island by less than 900 votes. Brooklyn, where Impellitteri was supported by Kenneth F. Sutherland’s county organization, revolted against Sutherland and went for Wagner by more than 40,000 votes. It was a staggering defeat for the veteran Brooklyn politician in his first test since assuming the county leadership. The Wagner steamroller carried through his slate of running mates with the exception of Matthew J. Troy, who ran for the nomination for county judge. Hyman Barshay won despite the Wagner tide by nearly 25,000 votes. Abe Stark, Brownsville merchant and civic leader, defeated Assistant District Attorney Julius Helfand for the nomination for City Council president, although the Stark margin was less than Wagner’s. … The Wagner triumph was surprising mainly because he was conceded a chance to defeat Impellitteri only if a substantial portion of the city’s 2,132,181 enrolled Democrats went to the polls. As it turned out, less than 550,000 voted — a quarter of the eligibles — reflecting apathy on the part of the electorate.”

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Alexis Bledel
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Amy Poehler
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include actress and singer Janis Paige, who was born in 1922; “West Side Story” star George Chakiris, who was born in 1934; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Betty Kelly (Martha and the Vandellas), who was born in 1944; “St. Elsewhere” star Ed Begley Jr., who was born in 1949; “The Wrestler” star Mickey Rourke, who was born in 1952; Baseball Hall of Famer Robin Yount, who was born in 1955; magician and actor David Copperfield, who was born in 1956; Baseball Hall of Famer and former N.Y. Yankees outfielder Tim Raines, who was born in 1959; former “Saturday Night Live” star Molly Shannon, who was born in 1964; singer-songwriter Marc Anthony, who was born in 1968; “Parks and Recreation” star Amy Poehler, who was born in 1971; “Gilmore Girls” star Alexis Bledel, who was born in 1981; and singer-songwriter Nick Jonas, who was born in 1992.

Marc Anthony
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

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ANARCHY IN THE U.S.A.: New York City’s financial district was attacked on this day in 1920. The J.P. Morgan Bank at Wall and Broad streets was bombed by unknown assailants who used a horse-drawn cart filled with dynamite and 500 pounds of iron sash weights. Thirty-eight people were killed, more than 140 were seriously injured and hundreds more were slightly injured. The perpetrators were never caught, but Italian anarchists were suspected.

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WE LOVED THEM: The Beatles released “She Loves You” in the U.S. on this day in 1963. The song reached No. 1 for two weeks in March 1964 and was one of five Beatles songs that held the top five spots on the American charts simultaneously.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Work, hard work, intelligent work, and then more work.”

— railroad executive James J. Hill, who was born on this day in 1838


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