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September 3: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 3, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1932, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported that it was “in a position today to tell the inside story of how and why Mayor [Jimmy] Walker reached the decision to resign his office late Thursday afternoon on the eve of the resumption of his trial before Governor [Franklin] Roosevelt. At a secret conference in Manhattan that afternoon, attended by a number of the city’s foremost Democratic leaders, among them Tammany Leader John F. Curry and Brooklyn Leader John H.I. McCooey, the mayor was informed that Roosevelt had definitely made up his mind to oust him. The information came from one of Walker’s allies who had visited the governor on Wednesday and talked over the Walker case with him. Once the full import of the information was realized by those at the parley, Walker decided to rob the situation of whatever political advantage it might have for the governor by resigning before an ouster order could be signed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle reported, “The United Fruit liner Limon, one of more than half a dozen rescue vessels groping through mountainous waves, sea-mist worse than fog and the deadly sub-surface, teeth-like coral reefs that dot that particular area off the Florida coast, reported this afternoon that it was alongside the stranded Morgan Line flagship Dixie. No effort would be made until the hurricane abated, the Limon added in a message received by Tropical Radio and relayed to the Associated Press, to transfer the 229 passengers and 120 in the crew. The news followed a day of conflicting reports in which some rescue ships took the Dixie’s word that she was caught on Carysfort Reef, while the United Fruit liner Platano, after a vain search, insisted it must be French Reef. French Reef is about eight miles below Carysfort, and four and a half miles off shore … The rescue ships, playing tag with destruction themselves, inched about in soupy, treacherous weather trying to find the stricken 8,000-ton liner, on whose decks at least some passengers were injured, according to early wireless reports.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “‘Man the spray guns’ has become the battle cry of residents in the neighborhood of S. 9th St., between Roebling and Havemeyer Sts., Williamsburg, in a defensive war they are waging against an invading army of caterpillars. Not content with ruining trees, the fuzzy invaders are entering homes, getting into beds, pantries and food. Some householders say they have been unable to eat in their own homes. ‘It’s disgusting,’ said Mrs. Rose Cohen. ‘You can’t open your windows because the caterpillars come in, and in this hot weather you must have air. They even get in the bed. You can’t sleep in the rooms.’ The caterpillar invaders were first observed about two weeks ago. They have bivouacked in the trees, spinning white webs around the trunks and limbs and there laying their eggs. With each mild breeze, the caterpillars fall from the trees by the hundreds. From backyards, they have made their way over buildings to the street, where they are attacking other trees. Spray guns are a popular weapon with the beleaguered householders.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “(U.P.) — Polio cases are running 40 percent below a five-year average in the 217 areas where some 440,000 children were vaccinated against the disease last spring. The children vaccinated were in the six, seven and eight-year-old groups. These groups, along with the five and nine-year-olders, usually account for 50 to 60 percent of all polio cases. The comparative percentages of these statistics compiled by the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis match, more or less, but no one should take the matching as anything more than a hopeful indication that the experimental Salk vaccine may have been effective. Dr. Hart E. Van Riper, the foundation’s medical director, refused to comment on the grounds he is an interested party, and anyway it is extremely essential to get a completely scientific evaluation of the vaccine’s worth as a polio preventive. That evaluating is being done at the University of Michigan and it will be next spring, at the earliest, before the Michigan scientists can make their report.”

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Garrett Hedlund
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Kaia Gerber
Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Al Jardine (The Beach Boys), who was born in 1942; “Superman” star Valerie Perrine, who was born in 1943; Grand Funk Railroad drummer Don Brewer, who was born in 1948; “The Sopranos” star Steve Schirripa, who was born in Brooklyn in 1957; “Seinfeld” writer Spike Feresten, who was born in 1964; former NBA Rookie of the Year Damon Stoudamire, who was born in 1973; “Bring It On” star Clare Kramer, who was born in 1974; former NFL defensive end Jevon Kearse, who was born in 1976; “Friday Night Lights” star Garrett Hedlund, who was born in 1984; snowboarder and Olympic gold medalist Shaun White, who was born in 1986; and model and actress Kaia Gerber, who was born in 2001.

Steve Schirripa
Scott Roth/Invision/AP

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U.S.A., U.S.A., PART 1: The flag of the United States was flown in battle for the first time on this day in 1777, at Cooch’s Bridge, Delaware, during the American Revolution. The battle site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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U.S.A., U.S.A., PART 2: The Treaty of Paris was signed by Britain and the U.S. on this day in 1783, ending the American Revolution. American signatories included John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and John Jay.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The measure of who we are is what we do with what we have.”

— Vince Lombardi, who died on this day in 1970


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