Brooklyn Boro

Southwest Brooklyn, near water’s edge, feels brunt of the storm

September 2, 2021 Jaime de Jesus, Brooklynreporter.com
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While the effects of Hurricane Ida were felt throughout New York City, they were especially evident in vulnerable southern Brooklyn on Wednesday.

According to the National Weather Service, the city received 3-5 inches of rain an hour.

A tornado warning was in effect for Kings County for much of the evening.

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The upper level lanes of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge were closed at around 9 p.m. due to high winds. The day afterward, parts of Owl’s Head Park in Bay Ridge were either totally flooded out or inundated with mud, according to published reports.

U.S. Rep. Nicole Malliotakis (D-Southwest Brooklyn-Staten Island) called on President Joe Biden to issue a Stafford Act declaration (authorizing the president to declare a major disaster or emergency) to provide federal support to the city and state.

“It is now clear that flooding from tropical depression Ida was worse than that of tropical storm Henri, and has even led to multiple deaths in New York City,” Malliotakis said. “There has been rampant flooding throughout homes, businesses, subway stations and streets.

“Governor Hochul has already declared a state of emergency, and it is imperative that President Biden authorize FEMA to alleviate the hardship and suffering caused by this storm and provide financial assistance to the city, state and residents affected,” she said.

Shortly before midnight, Mayor Bill de Blasio declared a state of emergency for all five boroughs. Gov. Kathy Hochul also declared a state of emergency in the state.

“We’re enduring an historic weather event tonight with record-breaking rain across the city, brutal flooding and dangerous conditions on our roads,” de Blasio said.

The MTA shut every train line down shortly afterward.

“Torrential rains caused massive amounts of water to enter subways and flood roads, creating severe disruptions to service,” said Janno Lieber, acting MTA chair and CEO. “Our concern is for those who were in trains stuck after up to six inches of rain fell within hours, and the top priority is working with first responders to safely evacuate everyone from the system.”

Service is slowly being restored throughout the day, with significant delays.

“Service is extremely limited because of flooding across New York City,” the MTA said in a statement

Alternate-side parking was also suspended citywide.

“Please continue to stay off the roads as much as possible as we continue storm operations,” de Blasio said at 8 a.m. on Sept. 2.


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  1. FlatbushFred

    “Governor Hochul has already declared a state of emergency, and it is imperative that President Biden authorize FEMA to alleviate the hardship and suffering caused by this storm and provide financial assistance to the city, state and residents affected,” said Malliotakis, Trump supporter and member of the party that denies climate change and doesn’t want the Federal government to spend money, and thinks COVID is a hoax. Glad she is looking out for the health and well-being of her constituents.