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August 18: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

August 18, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1906, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “News received in this city today regarding the havoc wrought by the earthquake at Valparaiso, Chile, continued to be very meager. No direct communication with the devastated seaport has yet been established and reports coming to hand through roundabout channels lack detail, and in most instances, are conflicting. Some state that practically the entire town was destroyed, with heavy loss of life. Other dispatches declare that the early reports were greatly exaggerated, that the zone of destruction was confined to the avenues surrounding two squares and that few persons were killed or injured. Regarding the progress of the fire which was reported to have followed in the wake of the quake there is a similar lack of reliable information. Cablegrams were received in Manhattan today stating that the flames had completed the work begun by the earthquake, only to be followed, a little later, by other cablegrams, apparently from equally as authentic sources, saying that the fire had been confined to the business district and was under control early this afternoon. Until the cables between here and the scene of the catastrophe are in working order again, or until the telegraph wires strung over the Andes from Valparaiso to Buenos Aires, or some other South American city, have been restored, it is improbable that any definite information as to the extent of the cataclysm will be obtainable.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Eagle reported, “ALBANY — The absolute deadlock between the two governors of New York today continued unabated. Both William Sulzer, who holds the executive offices in spite of his impeachment, and Lieutenant Governor Martin H. Glynn, who claims to be acting governor, were in the state capitol, but both men carefully refrained from making any move toward ousting the other one or to have the dispute thrown into the courts. Both men received visitors and had conferences with counsel, but neither would make any statements for publication. The escape of Harry K. Thaw has complicated the situation, and Governor Sulzer had a conference with Superintendent of Prisons John B. Riley of Plattsburgh. Although Mr. Glynn yesterday sent a request to Mr. Riley for information about the escape, there was no move toward a personal conference today. The delicacy of the situation is well illustrated by the two replies sent by Judge Riley to the two men who claim the governorship. These two telegrams had the same contents and were worded in the same manner, but neither was addressed to either of the men as ‘Governor.’ The salutation used by the diplomatic head of the prison department was, ‘The Honorable.’ ‘They are both entitled to that form of greeting, are they not?’ asked Judge Riley when discussing the subject.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “MOSCOW, AUG. 1 — The new Soviet ambassador to Afghanistan, Comrade [Leonid] Stark, has delivered his credentials to the ruler of that country, the emir, according to a dispatch from Kabul several days ago. Stark takes the place of the well-known Russian revolutionist and publicist, [Fyodor] Raskolnikov, who was withdrawn from his post after the former British government had protested, in the famous Curzon ultimatum, against his activities in the land of the Afghans. In Afghanistan, as well as in Persia, Russia and England have come to grips. During the last four years there has been constant friction in Kabul between Soviet and British representatives. It is even claimed that much of the trouble on the northwestern frontier of India, where blood has been flowing in streams since the end of the World War, is to be traced in a large measure to the struggle for influence in this backward state of Central Asia.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (A.P.) — Plans for sending American economic and financial experts to Cuba to aid in that country’s restoration were formed today in a long-distance telephone conversation between Ambassador Sumner Welles at Havana and State Department officials. The delegation to be dispatched shortly, at the invitation of the new Cuban government, would study conditions and recommend ways of reorganizing Cuba’s finances and industries, suffering from the effects of depression, revolution and strikes.”

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Andy Samberg
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Madeleine Stowe
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, who was born in 1927; Oscar-winner Robert Redford, who was born in 1936; “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman” star Martin Mull, who was born in 1943; comedian Elayne Boosler, who was born in Brooklyn in 1952; “Rescue Me” star Denis Leary, who was born in 1957; “Revenge” star Madeleine Stowe, who was born in 1958; TV journalist Bob Woodruff, who was born in 1961; “Fight Club” star Edward Norton, who was born in 1969; “Heathers” star Christian Slater, who was born in 1969; “Malcolm & Eddie” star Malcolm-Jamal Warner, who was born in 1970; “Man Walks Into a Room” author and Brooklyn resident Nicole Krauss, who was born in 1974; former “Saturday Night Live” star Andy Samberg, who was born in 1978; former N.Y. Jets linebacker Bart Scott, who was born in 1980; and former N.Y. Giants tight end Jeremy Shockey, who was born in 1980.

Nicole Krauss
Jim Cooper/AP

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GONE GIRL: Virginia Dare, the first child of English parents to be born in the New World, was born to Ellinor and Ananias Dare at Roanoke Island, N.C., on this day in 1587. When a ship arrived to replenish the colony’s supplies in 1590, the settlers, including Virginia Dare, had vanished without a trace.

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MADE TO ORDER: The first mail-order catalog was published by Montgomery Ward on this day in 1872. It was only a single sheet of paper. By 1904 the Montgomery Ward catalog weighed four pounds. In 1985 the company closed its catalog operation; in 2000 it announced the closing of its retail stores.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“People ask me what race I am, but there is no such thing as race. I just answer: ‘I’m a member of the human race.’”

— Civil rights activist Amelia Boynton Robinson, who was born on this day in 1911


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