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June 21: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 21, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “PARIS — Members of the Peace Conference and Parisians generally are trying to believe the Germans will sign, but secret information from Weimar indicates that the Independent Socialists wish to sign, that the Majority Socialists and the Catholic Center party are divided, but that the Majority Socialists will follow Erzberger. The National Liberals seem definitely against signing. Meanwhile the Allied military authorities are proceeding with their preparations to advance, as if the German refusal to yield were a certainty, and at the same time the Conference authorities at Versailles are making their preparations for the final ceremony, acting apparently on the assumption that the signatures of the German envoys will be attached to the treaty. Interest in the proceedings, which has lagged and all but died, is brought to a dramatic pitch by the suspense. At no time since the armistice has there been such tense expectation. No one has any definite opinion either way, but most people seem to believe that the Germans, out of sheer stupidity, if for no other reason, will attempt a refusal.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “COMPIEGNE FOREST, via German field telephone to Berlin (U.P.) — Adolf Hitler today gave to France his terms of armistice on the spot where Germany signed an end to the World War in 1918. The fuehrer had the famous 1918 armistice railroad car moved to the exact spot where the first armistice was signed and sat in the seat which Marshal Foch occupied at that time. I stood in the old dining car No. 2419-D of the Wagon-Lits Company today where the World War armistice was signed and watched the German chancellor hand to French delegates the terms by which he would heal a 22-year-old ache to German pride. Outside the sun was bright and the pleasant forests of Compiegne were quiet and at peace. War seemed far away. The terms given France today were based on three premises. They were read to the four French emissaries by Col. Wilhelm Keitel after Hitler had handed them his terms. The armistice, said the preamble read by Keitel, must: 1. Assure Germany that France will not again take up the battle; 2. Give Germany assurances needed for carrying on the war against Britain; 3. Lay the foundations for an ultimate new peace in which Germany will receive restitution for wrongs done her ‘by force of arms.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “Despite his repeated insistence that he would not seek a fourth term, Mayor LaGuardia today appeared to be a possible mayoralty candidate. Asked in Buffalo yesterday if he was definitely out of the race, the mayor declared: ‘Nothing is definite these days.’ The mayor was interviewed at the Buffalo Airport while en route to a joint session of the United States Conference of Mayors and the Canadian Federation of Mayors in Toronto.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “SAVANNAH, GA. (UPI) — A noisy anti-segregation demonstration staged by about 50 Negroes brought a police riot squad racing to Savannah’s Oglethorpe Park with tear gas grenades. Police remained at a distance while the Negroes sang ‘Freedom Hymns’ and continued their demonstrations late into the afternoon. Leaders planned for 5,000 Negroes to assemble around the school board building later to protest classroom segregation. The trouble erupted here and in four other southern states as President Kennedy late yesterday sent Congress proposed legislation to carry out his call for expanded job training and vocational education opportunities for Negroes. The bills, which would add $400 million to the federal budget, are a part of his program to ease racial tension. They would enlarge the scope of previously planned programs. In his civil rights message to Congress Wednesday, the president noted that the unemployment rate for Negroes is twice as high as that for whites. He said his new legislative proposals would offer Negroes a better chance for better jobs at higher pay.”

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Lana Del Rey
Georges Biard/Wikimedia Commons
Prince William
USAID/Vietnam/Wikimedia Commons

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “The Love Boat” star Bernie Kopell, who was born in Brooklyn in 1933; “Goodnight, Beantown” star Mariette Hartley, who was born in 1940; “SCTV” star Joe Flaherty, who was born in 1941; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Ray Davies (The Kinks), who was born in 1944; “Family Ties” star Meredith Baxter, who was born in 1947; “Family Ties” star Michael Gross, who was born in 1947; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Joey Kramer (Aerosmith), who was born in 1950; former N.J. Nets center Derrick Coleman, who was born in 1967; “Cape Fear” star Juliette Lewis, who was born in 1973; “Smallville” star Erica Durance, who was born in 1978; “Guardians of the Galaxy” star Chris Pratt, who was born in 1979; former N.J. Nets forward Richard Jefferson, who was born in 1980; The Killers singer Brandon Flowers, who was born in 1981; Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, who was born in 1982; and “Young and Beautiful” singer Lana Del Rey, who was born in 1985.

Chris Pratt
Dick Thomas Johnson/Wikimedia Commons

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SOLAR SOLITUDE: The first manned private spaceflight took place on this day in 2004. Michael Melvill, flying the privately financed SpaceShipOne, flew 62 miles in altitude, leaving Earth’s atmosphere. The spacecraft was designed by Burt Rutan and was financed by Paul Allen, philanthropist and Microsoft cofounder. SpaceShipOne made the flight from Mojave Airport in California.

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GET ON BOARD: Today is “Go Skateboarding Day.” Held since 2004, it was founded by the International Association of Skateboard Companies and is the official holiday of skateboarding. For more information, visit www.theiasc.org.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“Man’s capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man’s inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary.”
— theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, who was born on this day in 1892


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