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June 15: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 15, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Senator Charles Curtis of Kansas has Indian blood in his veins and in his youth wore the regulation blanket of his Indian forefathers. He was born Jan. 25, 1860, on the Kaw Indian reservation in Kansas, a descendant of a line of Indian chieftains and French and Canadian traders. His mother died when he was a child, and he was brought up by an Indian grandmother, who later sent him to his white relatives in Topeka for a white man’s education. The education he got, which made him a U.S. senator and now a candidate for vice president of the United States, was the conglomerate outcome of what he learned in such ‘big cities’ as Topeka and out on the near-frontiers of Kansas and vicinity. He became famous in the west as a jockey, he worked as a hack driver, practiced law and taught Sunday school, and became an anti-vice crusader. Eventually he was elected as a representative from his own state. He had been before mentioned for the Republican vice presidential nomination.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (A.P.) — Administration forces left it up to Majority Leader [Joe T.] Robinson (D., Ark.) today to decide when to begin Senate debate on the Roosevelt court bill. The heavy-set Arkansan, boomed by many colleagues for a place on the Supreme Court, kept his own counsel. He took no formal notice of reports that efforts to devise an acceptable compromise were proceeding in private. The court bill was put on the calendar yesterday after ten members of the Judiciary Committee submitted a fiery report opposing its enactment … A leading opposition senator, who asked not to be quoted by name, said a motion to take up the court bill might come from the foes unless Robinson takes the initiative within two weeks. Once it does begin, debate on the bill adding up to six justices to the Supreme Court — unless justices over 70 retire — may last more than six weeks, foes of the measure said. ‘Unless the ‘packing plan’ and proposal for ‘roving justices’ are dropped,’ said Senator [Burton K.] Wheeler (D., Mont.), ‘this session won’t be over by October.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “Introducing District Attorney [William] O’Dwyer as the next mayor, Assemblyman Philip J. Schupler told members of the Kings County Physicians Guild at a dinner last night in the Midwood Grill, 1145 Flatbush Ave.: ‘With Mr. O’Dwyer in City Hall we will have clean and honest government for all the people regardless of party. He will follow in the footsteps of one of the greatest men of all time, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.’ In his address, the district attorney avoided mention of politics. He centered his talk on the fighting in Italy, saying that there ‘we had a meaner front than was publicized. You’d have to see the badly wounded boys coming back from the front to realize how mean it was.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “MEXICO CITY (U.P.) — Reports received here from a neighboring Central American capital said today that the Guatemalan Army has given President Jacobo Arbenz an ultimatum to prove his government is not Communist-dominated or get out by tonight. The ultimatum was said to have been served on Arbenz by 80 high-ranking Guatemalan Army officers. There was no immediate confirmation of the report from any other source. But there was abundant evidence that the smoldering situation within Guatemala was building up to a blow-off. Three political parties loyal to Arbenz issued a manifesto pledging support ‘in a moment in which external and internal forces are plotting to subvert the constitutional regime.’ Guatemalan exiles arriving here told of a reign of terror in the past several days against anti-Communist leaders, including torture, death and wholesale arrests. Other exiles reported that residents of the exclusive residential area surrounding the national palace in Guatemala City have moved out in anticipation of an early anti-Communist revolution.”

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Leah Remini
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Courteney Cox
Felicia C. Sullivan/Wikimedia

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Baseball Hall of Famer Billy Williams, who was born in 1938; political activist and businessman Ward Connerly, who was born in 1939; Super Bowl-winning coach Mike Holmgren, who was born in 1948; three-time National League Manager of the Year Dusty Baker, who was born in 1949; “Dance Fever” host Deney Terrio, who was born in 1950; Kansas lead singer Steve Walsh, who was born in 1951; “According to Jim” star Jim Belushi, who was born in 1954; humanitarian Paul Rusesabagina, who was born in 1954; Baseball Hall of Famer and former Yankee Wade Boggs, who was born in 1958; “The Young and the Restless” star Eileen Davidson, who was born in 1959; Oscar-winning actress Helen Hunt, who was born in 1963; “Friends” star Courteney Cox, who was born in 1964; “The King of Queens” star Leah Remini, who was born in 1970; former Yankee and 2001 ALCS MVP Andy Pettitte, who was born in 1972; and “How I Met Your Mother” star Neil Patrick Harris, who was born in 1973.

Andy Pettitte
Kathy Willens/AP

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LAW OF THE LAND: On this day in 1215, King John of England sealed the Magna Carta ‘in the meadow called Ronimed between Windsor and Staines.” Continually reinterpreted, the Magna Carta influenced the rise of England’s constitutional monarchy and lent historical weight to 18th-century ideas about inalienable natural law. It is still invoked popularly and in jurisprudence as a symbol of the written law’s power to subdue tyranny. Four original copies of the 1215 charter survive.

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COLLEGE CREDIT: The 12th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on this day in 1804. It changed the method of electing the president and vice president after a tie in the electoral college during the election of 1800. Rather than each elector voting for two candidates, with the candidate receiving the most votes elected president and the second-place candidate elected vice president, each elector was now required to designate their choice for president and vice president, respectively.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“You campaign in poetry. You govern in prose.”

— former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, who was born on this day in 1932


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