Brooklyn Boro

June 3: ON THIS DAY in 1937, Edward and Wally are married at Monts

June 3, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Germany, by striking with her submarines at the doors of America, has admitted to the world that the American army will turn the tide against her on the battlefields of France. As first news of the submarine raid on the Atlantic coast brought to the Navy Department today by Associated Press dispatches was followed by official reports, naval officials declared that the American anti-submarine forces in home waters were ample to meet the attack. All along the coastline, naval flying boats, submarine chasers and numberless other naval craft immediately got into action. All officials declared that the Navy Department was fully equipped to meet the thrust at the very fountain head of the flow of American troops to Europe, and that all its agencies were being brought into full force to find the submarines and destroy them.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — President Roosevelt has abandoned plans for action on his Supreme Court reorganization bill at this session of Congress, a source close to the White House indicated today. A high administration official — who has been close to the president during the judiciary controversy — said that his advice was for Mr. Roosevelt to leave the measure on the calendar so that it might be revived next session ‘if conditions warrant.’ The White House maintained its position that ‘no compromise’ would be accepted.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “A possibility that more than 500 candidates will make a bid for the 12 or 13 places open to Brooklyn representatives on the new City  Council under proportional representation was seen today by Commissioner J.A. Livingston of the Board of Elections. He said he was certain that 125 candidates at least would enter the race and that ‘it is possible to have more than 500 candidates though not probable.’ The Board of Elections met today in the Municipal Building, Manhattan, to lay plans for voting in November under the proportional representation system which was upheld by the Court of Appeals yesterday. It was believed that because of the huge cost which would be involved, paper ballots would be used for electing city councilmen under the new system while the regular machines will be used for all other offices. Mayor LaGuardia today greeted the Court of Appeals decision with a one-word speech of praise. ‘Fine!’ exclaimed the mayor.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “Republican leaders shifted their plans unexpectedly in the municipal election campaign last night. With everything indicating they would be forced to meet a powerful Democratic-American Labor party political coalition behind District Attorney [William] O’Dwyer for mayor, the GOP chieftains called off a slate-making conference scheduled for Wednesday at Brooklyn’s Hotel Bossert and agreed to meet later in the week. The apparent explanation of the postponement was that the Republican leaders, before deciding on an independent ticket in combination with the anti-Communist Liberal party, were taking extra precautions against embarking on a course of action until the Democratic-Labor party coalition becomes official. The Democratic leaders meet to name their ticket Tuesday and the CIO-PAC planning board, working through the American Labor party, has its meeting scheduled for Thursday.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Four Puerto Rican Nationalists, who terrorized the House of Representatives chamber on March 1, today were put on trial for firing the wild fusillade that wounded five congressmen. Each is charged with five counts of assault with intent to kill and five counts of assault with a deadly weapon. Maximum prison terms upon conviction could be 125 years. The fantastic shooting, they have said, was hatched as a political demonstration to demand ‘freedom’ for Puerto Rico. Ironically, U.S. Attorney Leo A. Rover is prosecutor of the four. He was the court-appointed attorney who defended Oscar Collazo, the Puerto Rican terrorist who attempted to assassinate former President Truman. Collazo was sentenced to die in the electric chair but Mr. Truman commuted his sentence to life.”

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Deniece Williams
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Imogen Poots
Jack Plunkett/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Basketball Hall of Famer Billy Cunningham, who was born in Brooklyn in 1943; sprinter and Olympic gold medalist Edith McGuire, who was born in 1944; World Golf Hall of Famer Hale Irwin, who was born in 1945; “Hey There Lonely Girl” singer Eddie Holman, who was born in 1946; special effects wizard John Dykstra, who was born in 1947; “Let’s Hear It for the Boy” singer Deniece Williams, who was born in 1950; “Can’t We Try” singer Dan Hill, who was born in 1954; Slayer co-founder Kerry King, who was born in 1964; CNN anchor Anderson Cooper, who was born in 1967; tennis great Rafael Nadal, who was born in 1986; and “28 Weeks Later” star Imogen Poots, who was born in 1989.

Rafael Nadal
Rodrigo Abd/AP

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THE DRIVE TO SUCCEED: Ransom Olds was born on this day in 1864. The American automobile inventor and manufacturer founded the Olds Motor Works, which made Oldsmobile, the first affordable, mass-produced American car. It was also the first automobile produced in quantity with a progressive assembly system and composed of interchangeable parts. He died in 1950.

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LIBERATION IN PARIS: Josephine Baker was born on this day in 1906. The sensation of 1920s Paris, Baker was born into poverty in St. Louis. She began working as a dancer at age 16 and went to Paris in 1925, where her seminude “danse sauvage” became a hit. She was the first American-born woman to be awarded the Croix de Guerre and the Legion of Honor, in recognition of her Red Cross work during World War II. Baker performed up until her death on April 12, 1975.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable: 

“The things we truly love stay with us always, locked in our hearts as long as life remains.”
— Josephine Baker, who was born on this day in 1906

 


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