Brooklyn Boro

May 20: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 20, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1861, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Southern papers falsely assert that ‘the correspondence of the Associated Press is largely controlled or dictated by Lincoln’s views and preferences,’ while they themselves are constantly publishing the most foolish and extravagant stories against the government and those engaged in the administration of its affairs.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1923, the Eagle reported, “Columbia’s baseball nine swamped Wesleyan yesterday at South Field by the overwhelming score of 15-2. The victory was due largely to [Lou] Gehrig, star Blue and White twirler. Gehrig allowed only three hits. He also did some timely batting. Gehrig started the ball rolling for Columbia in the first inning when he hit his seventh homer of the season, chasing Kennedy in ahead of him. He also singled and was walked twice. The Morningsiders were in rare form, the entire team going on a batting spree for the grand total of 19 hits.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (A.P.) — President Roosevelt’s closest Senate advisers were urging him today to withdraw his court reform bill or restrict it to two additional justices. They argued that the original bill no longer is needed, because the court is construing the Constitution more broadly and because of Justice Van Devanter’s retirement. Mr. Roosevelt still gave no public indication he would yield. Many senators predicted he would stand firm until the court decides the constitutionality of the Social Security law. There were indications, however, of private negotiations for a compromise. Administration leaders in the Senate certainly were talking it. The president himself called Senator Nye (R., N.D.) to the White House yesterday for a conference, which Nye would not discuss afterwards. The North Dakotan, one of the last Republican senators to declare against the Roosevelt bill, frequently has criticized the Supreme Court. He long has been associated with Senators Norris (Ind., Neb.) and La Follette (Prog., Wis.), both of whom are supporting the court bill.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Government officials have virtually decided to ration gasoline on a nationwide basis — possibly by July 1 — to conserve dwindling and irreplaceable rubber stocks, it was indicated today. Arthur B. Newhall, War Production Board rubber coordinator, said nationwide gasoline rationing was ‘inevitable before the end of the summer.’ The Office of Defense Transportation is working on rationing plans which may be presented at the War Production Board meeting Tuesday. President Roosevelt believes the eastern states oil shortage should be treated as a national rather than sectional problem. Newhall explained that gasoline rationing would be necessary — even in oil producing areas — because the passenger car tires now on hand are all civilians can expect until the war is won. The new or permanent gasoline rationing system will involve rationing back to the refineries, somewhat along the line of the sugar rationing, Office of Price Administration officials said. That means that the filling station owners would save the coupons taken from a motorist’s ration card and present them before he could purchase more gasoline.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “TEL AVIV (U.P.) — Huge fires were reported raging through the old walled city of Jerusalem today as Arabs and Jews battled at close quarters for control of the Holy City. British sources said artillery and mortar fire have made a shambles of the ancient heart of Christendom, site of some of the western world’s most cherished religious shrines. Heavy censorship by both Jews and Arabs clouded events of the furious battle within Jerusalem, but it appeared the old city may have to be rebuilt for the 19th time in history no matter which side is victor. Professional soldiers of King Abdullah’s Arab Legion launched an attack on the old walled city yesterday under cover of a crushing artillery barrage and by late last night appeared to have driven the Jews into a pocket in the southwest Armenian section. Jewish sources admitted that one of the fiercest fights of the Palestine War was raging amid the rabbit warrens of the Armenian section, where both the Jewish Army and Arab Legion have been reinforced for the showdown battle.”

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Cher
Ian Smith/Wikimedia Commons
Busta Rhymes
Mikamote/Wikimedia Commons

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Pro Football Hall of Famer Bud Grant, who was born in  1927; “General Hospital” star Constance Towers, who was born in 1933; Japanese baseball legend Sadaharu Oh, who was born in 1940; Oscar-winning actress Cher, who was born in 1946; “SCTV” star Dave Thomas, who was born in 1949; former New York Gov. David Paterson, who was born in 1954; “Relic” co-author Douglas Preston, who was born in 1956; Go-Go’s guitarist Jane Wiedlin, who was born in 1958; “Scandal” star Tony Goldwyn, who was born in 1960; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher David Wells, who was born in 1963; “Justified” star Timothy Olyphant, who was born in 1968; rapper and actor Busta Rhymes, who was born in 1972; and “Fight Song” singer Rachel Platten, who was born in 1981.

Timothy Olyphant
Peabody Awards/Wikimedia Commons

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A WONDERFUL LIFE: Jimmy Stewart was born on this day in 1908. The Pennsylvania native was best known for his everyman roles in films such as “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” “The Philadelphia Story” and “It’s a Wonderful Life.” He died in 1997.

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LONG DISTANCE: Amelia Earhart crossed the Atlantic on this day in 1932. Earhart left Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, Canada, at 7 p.m. and landed near Londonderry, Ireland. The 2,026-mile flight took 13 hours and 30 minutes. She was the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“The pupil who is never required to do what he cannot do, never does what he can do.”
— philosopher John Stuart Mill, who was born on this day in 1806


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