Brooklyn Boro

April 14: ON THIS DAY in 1945, Cortege arrives in capital

April 14, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Brooklyn stores and theaters were closed today, most of them all day, as the borough joined in the general mourning on the day of President Roosevelt’s funeral. War plants remained open in the interest of increased production. All major department stores in the downtown area shut their doors, following a recommendation of the Retail Dry Goods Association of New York City, and local merchants’ associations halted business. Brooklyn motion picture theaters will be closed until 6 p.m. in accordance with a request of the war activities committee of the motion picture industry. Leadership among the local merchants’ associations was taken by the Flatbush Chamber of Commerce. A similar decision to close was made by the merchants’ associations of Pitkin Ave., Sutter Ave., Utica-Parkway and Grand Ave., the Ridgewood Chamber of Commerce and the 86th St. Board of Trade … Drug stores, because of the essential nature of their business, remained open. Most food stores will close at 4 p.m. or shut down for an afternoon period. At 4 p.m., starting time of the President’s funeral, all subway and elevated trains will come to a stop.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “Brooklynites flocked today to Health Department centers, child health stations, municipal and private hospitals and their own physicians to comply with Mayor O’Dwyer’s request that everyone in the city be inoculated against smallpox. Meanwhile, the Navy Department came to the city’s aid today by furnishing 250,000 units of smallpox vaccine, giving assurance that enough will be available within the next 10 days to vaccinate at least 5,000,000 residents in the mass immunization campaign. The vaccine was rushed to the Health Department offices in Manhattan from the Brooklyn Naval Medical Supply Depot, after the Mayor made a telephone plea to Navy Secretary Forrestal for aid. The navy meanwhile was checking its supplies of vaccine in San Francisco and will fly more here if it has a sufficient stock. The army also was checking its vaccine stores along the East Coast. The most ambitious program to stamp out a disease in the city’s history was getting into full swing, more than 12,000 persons having been vaccinated yesterday at Health Department centers, with additional thousands lining up at voluntary and general hospitals and private physicians’ offices.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “A driving half-inch snowfall with freezing temperatures that set a new cold record for this date snarled up street traffic during the morning rush-hour today and brought the city’s sand and salt-spreaders out of storage to open up bridges and main highways. The snow began to fall at dawn and came in spurts all morning. The temperature dropped to 25 at 6:45 a.m., well below the previous April 14 low record — 28.3 in 1940. Dr. Wallace E. Howell, the city’s official rain-maker, hoping to increase the snowfall, started two generators near Cobleskill, N.Y., belching a silver iodide vapor skyward at 11:30 a.m. If the plan works, it was said, the particles will stir the heavy overcast into a greater fall of snow — or rain — than unaided Nature would produce. The return of Winter, which started with minor snow flurries yesterday, was general throughout the Hudson Valley, all the way to Albany. Yesterday’s flurries may have been helped by the first actual rainmaking attempt by Dr. Howell, who sowed some clouds with dry ice particles to get more rain — or snow — to supply more water for the city’s reservoirs. Whether his efforts actually increase the amount of precipitation was not certain but, said Dr. Howell, ‘If we made the snowfall heavier, that’s all to the good.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Sunny skies and warm weather herald the joy of today’s Easter Sunday, and an unprecedented number of worshippers will give their thanks throughout the city and in Brooklyn, the ‘Borough of Churches.’ Temperatures are forecast in the middle sixties, accompanied by breezy ten to fifteen mile an hour winds, although those attending early morning services probably will need light topcoats. Hosannas, hallelujahs, brass, tympani and prayers will be lifted with the rising of the sun, and with the first rays, thousands of Brooklyn worshippers will gather on the new parade ground at Fort Hamilton for a traditional Easter service. Radio station WOR will broadcast the proceedings at 6:00 a.m.”


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