Brooklyn Boro

April 13: ON THIS DAY in 1945, Nation in mourning

April 13, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “TORONTO — Once regarded as a ‘joke’ hockey player, Muzz Patrick, the boss’ son, today had reached high-calibre rating in the Ranger artillery. The Leafs, facing extermination tonight in the sixth game of the Stanley Cup series, were frankly puzzled by the behemoth. They don’t know how to cope with him. He beat them Thursday night, may do it again. At any rate, the Rangers are 13-10 favorites tonight or 5 to 2 to win the Cup with a victory either tonight or Tuesday. It was Captain Trapper Coulter, backline boss of the Rangers, the tight-lipped walloper who pairs with the younger Patrick on the defense, who broke down and gave the explanation. ‘I’ve never seen a youngster with better co-ordination than Murray,’ said Coulter. ‘This was only his second year of big league hockey, but working beside him I saw him learn more than the average hockey player learns in three years … Why, it’s gotten now so that I trust his own judgment over my own.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — President Harry S. Truman took up the burden of the world’s most powerful office today with a pledge to win the war which Franklin D. Roosevelt’s leadership had carried to the verge of victory. Shocked as all others by news of Mr. Roosevelt’s death, Mr. Truman spoke his promise to the world a few minutes after taking the oath of office last night. ‘The world may be sure,’ he said, ‘that we will prosecute the war on both fronts, east and west, with all the vigor we possess to a successful conclusion.’ Conferences with army and navy leaders are understood to be high on the new President’s list today. The new President took the oath of office at 7:08 last night. Mr. Roosevelt, at 63, had served 12 years, 1 month and 8 days in the office whose cruel exactions killed him, but also stimulated his desire to stay on. No other man had served more than eight years.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “Mayor O’Dwyer last night set in motion the complicated machinery by which he hopes to have every one of the city’s 7,835,000 persons vaccinated against smallpox within the next three weeks. At an extraordinary press conference in City Hall, following a special meeting of his entire cabinet, the Mayor referred to the second death from the disease earlier in the day and declared: ‘There is a danger. The time has come as a health measure to urge everyone to be immunized against smallpox by vaccination. Since we’re fighting a hidden enemy, there is no way to win but to immunize everybody.’ An hour later, Police Commissioner Wallender called a special meeting of all division inspectors and precinct captains to outline plans for mobilizing members of the now-defunct civilian defense organization in a house-to-house campaign to urge everyone who has not been vaccinated in the last five to seven years to have the treatment. Mr. O’Dwyer said vaccinations will be given free at regular Health Department stations, city hospitals and baby health stations. Starting Wednesday, he added, free vaccinations also will be given at every police station from 9 a.m. until 10 p.m. daily, and as soon as supplies and manpower are available, immunization will be provided at each of the 383 fire houses in the five boroughs.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN (UPI) — Thousands of Good Friday pilgrims flocked to the Communist wall dividing Berlin in an attempt to see or wave to their relatives imprisoned behind the barrier. A record throng of West Germans flowed into the city by rail, highway and air in the hope of meeting families and friends in Communist East Berlin. West Berliners are not permitted to enter East Berlin, but West Germans are. Residents of West Berlin stood in silent groups along the concrete and barbed wire barrier. They hoped to catch a glimpse of parents, brothers or sisters on the other side of the wall and at least greet them with a wave. Authorities expected more than 100,000 visitors would crowd into West Berlin during Easter weekend. Virtually all the city’s hotels and rooming houses were full, and homeowners offered space to the visitors.”


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