Brooklyn Boro

April 6: ON THIS DAY in 1917, Wilson proclaims war

April 6, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Rejoice, ye Brooklyn fans, and deliver thanks, for our own Superbas fittingly dedicated Charles Hercules Ebbets’ magnificent stadium, the greatest ball park in these United States, by soundly trouncing Frank Chance’s Yankees yesterday afternoon to the merry tune of 3 to 2 in the presence of 25,000 wildly enthusiastic rooters, who jammed every available inch of space in the immense stadium — the greatest outpouring of baseball fanatics that ever turned out to witness an exhibition game — and at least 7,000 others, who witnessed the contest from the bluffs that loom above the field, over at Montgomery street and Bedford avenue. True, there were ten thousand or more who were turned away for lack of room, when, long before ‘Nap’ Rucker hurled the first ball over the plate, Charlie Ebbets found it impossible to squeeze another soul into the big stadium and ordered the entrances closed.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Eagle reported, “BALTIMORE, MD. — They got to stop kicking our Superbas around. This thing of pie-eyed managers in leagues big and little flashing child phenoms on our much esteemed ball team, and tying said team into double-twisted bowknots, is against all order and decency, especially when our Brooklyn National League pitchers are not delivering enough goods to make a reasonable load for an undersized small boy. Jack Dunn took his fling yesterday as the king of spring pastimes, to wit, springing phenoms on Brooklyn, when he sent against the Superbas a lad named George Ruth. George was in a school here when Dunn heard about him and had the energy to give him the once over. One was enough for Jack. He signed him, took him away from the school this year, and made a pitcher man of him. At least, he is making a pitcher of him, for in the finer points of the pastime George is as green as that English sod which we have read about and which the suffragettes are destroying.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Eagle reported, “President Wilson at 1:11 p.m. signed the resolution of Congress declaring a state of war between the United States and Germany. The Naval Militia and Naval Reserves were called to the colors with the President’s signing of the war resolution. The President also signed a proclamation, formally declaring a state of war between the United States and Germany. In the proclamation, he called upon American citizens to give support to all measures of the Government. The President makes a call for volunteers for the Regular Army and Militia … The resolution passed the House soon after 3 a.m. by a vote of 373 to 50, in the same form as adopted by the Senate Wednesday night. It declares that a state of war exists and directs the President to employ all the naval and military forces of the United States and resources of the Government to carry on war to a successful conclusion.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1920, an Eagle editorial stated, “Probably the first, certainly one of the first, fully equipped X-ray hospital departments in the United States was that of St. Mary’s Hospital here, and Dr. John A. Lee, who inaugurated it, suffered burns in his early experimentation which compelled several operations, and developed the lung trouble from which he died Sunday. In a strict sense he may be called a victim of science. To term him a martyr to science is hardly hyperbole, because not mere knowledge for its own sake, but knowledge to lessen human suffering and cure human disease was what he sought. He was only 48 when the end came. Dr. Lee, president of the Kings County Medical Society, had a high rank in his profession here. A volunteer in the World War, he served as surgeon-in-chief on the Hospital Ship Comfort, as responsible a place as any surgeon held. He was a patriot who did not let his own physical condition stand in the way of efficient service. Such citizenship is worthy of the most general emulation.”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment