Brooklyn Boro

March 10: ON THIS DAY in 1953, Dewey calls for subway authority to end deficits

March 10, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1922, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “George Wright, star shortstop of the Cincinnati Red Stockings, played throughout the entire season of 1869 for a salary of $1,200. The Red Stockings played fifty-seven games that year, of which they won fifty-six and tied one, a record which has never been duplicated. Wright was the highest paid member of the team. Babe Ruth, home run hitter extraordinaire, signed on Sunday a contract with the New York American League Club which will net him approximately $75,000 during the coming season. The contract is for three years, with a renewal option for two seasons additional. If continued for the full five years, George Herman Ruth will receive a total of not less than $375,000. These figures give an idea of the development of professional baseball in this country during the past fifty years.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “Army posts in Brooklyn, Long Island, Staten Island and New Jersey began firing a salute to William Howard Taft at sunrise today. About 1:15 a.m., at reveille, a salute of 13 guns was fired at each post. This was followed by half-hourly shots throughout the day. Colors will remain at half-staff for the next 30 days. At 10 a.m., troops were paraded, with regimental colors shrouded in black, and officers wearing mourning bands on their left arms and crepe on their sabers. At retreat, which occurs about 4:45 p.m., the 48-gun salute to the Union was to be fired.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “The Government is expected to present in court next week secret atom bomb information which three persons are accused of stealing to give to Russia. David Greenglass, a former Army sergeant at the Los Alamos, N.M., atomic installation, testified yesterday that he began passing such information to his brother-in-law, Julius Rosenberg, in 1944. Greenglass’ testimony climaxed the first week of the Government’s efforts to prove Rosenberg, his wife, Ethel, and Morton Sobell guilty of spying for Russia. If convicted, they could be sentenced to the electric chair. Greenglass, indicted as a co-conspirator with the three, pleaded guilty earlier.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “ALBANY — Governor [Thomas] Dewey today asked the Legislature to set up a transit operating authority to run New York City’s subway system on a ‘self-sustaining fare basis’ and to dispose of city-owned bus lines to private interests as soon as possible. In a strongly worded message, Dewey said that his proposed authority should institute ‘drastic economies’ to cut down the subway deficit. If the lines cannot be made fully self-sustaining, he indicated, a fare rise would be a necessity. ‘If such economies can reach the total of the $36,000,000 subway deficit, the present fare can be maintained,’ he said. ‘Whatever the event, the people of New York would have the satisfaction of knowing that transit was being operated on the lowest possible self-sustaining basis.’ … Dewey’s proposed authority would be made up of five men serving for six-year terms. Two would be appointed by the governor, two by the mayor and the fifth by the first four appointed.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Romance is blooming abroad in the Peace Corps. There have been 51 marriages overseas, plus an uncounted number of engagements. In the Philippines, there were 11 marriages last year. In Chile, two Peace Corps couples are expecting babies. In Tanganyika, two Peace Corps nurses announced engagements March 4 to fellow volunteers. Twins were born to a Peace Corps family in Africa on Christmas Day. What does headquarters think of all this? As a rule, it believes that volunteers generally can be more effective if they don’t get married overseas. It frowns on pregnancy among those who do. ‘In general, the Peace Corps discourages marriage during service,’ Padraic Kennedy, chief of the division of volunteer support, said yesterday. He said that ‘in exceptional cases,’ marriages have been approved by the Peace Corps country representative, ‘but only when the volunteer, despite the new responsibility, can continue to observe the rigorous standards of living conduct and work which all other volunteers must observe.’”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment