Brooklyn Boro

March 4: ON THIS DAY in 1933, Roosevelt hailed by crowd

March 4, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1861, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Today the Republican party takes possession of the executive branch of the federal government. Upon the men whom that party has succeeded in placing at the head of the nation now depends the responsibility of whatever may befall the country during the ominous period of the immediate future. The party has designedly assumed this responsibility, and postponed all attempts to settle the difficulties until they should gain possession of the reigns of government, which they assume today.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1869, the Eagle reported, “President [Andrew] Johnson has adopted the unusual course of presenting an address to the people on his retirement from office. He has a precedent for this in the example of but two of his predecessors – Generals [George] Washington and [Andrew] Jackson. General Washington modestly assumed to regard the farewell advice he proffered as intrusive, despite his great public services, the unanimous confidence the people reposed in him, and the almost paternal relation he bore to the young republic. General Jackson retired from his office full of years and honors. He too had rendered eminent public services in various capacities … President Johnson takes leave of the people on surrendering the powers of his office. If there are few precedents to justify him, it must be admitted that the events of his administration have been extraordinary. Under pretexts of guarding the country against his assaults, his office has been shorn of its most essential powers. His assailants in Congress have boasted that they would degrade him to the position of a clerk, and they have very nearly made good their words.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Eagle reported, “Formal ceremonies of inauguration which mark the beginning of the second term of President [Woodrow] Wilson and Vice President [Thomas R.] Marshall will be held at noon Monday in the Senate chamber and in the open air at the east front of the Capitol. Precedent for holding inaugural ceremonies on March 5 when March 4 falls on a Sunday was set as early as President [James] Monroe, on the advice of Chief Justice [John] Marshall, and was followed by Presidents [Zachary] Taylor and [Rutherford B.] Hayes … The formal ceremonies are set by program to begin at the Capitol at noon. Ordinarily they seldom have started at that hour because they have been dependent on the end of the session of Congress. Often in the last-hour crush and hurry, the hands of the clock in the Senate and House have been turned back as there was need, so that whatever time it really was, it officially was twelve o’clock noon when Congress ended its session and the inaugural ceremonies began by the convening of the Senate of the next Congress in extraordinary session.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1921, the Eagle reported, “Warren G. Harding of Ohio and Calvin Coolidge of Massachusetts were inaugurated today president and vice president of the United States … Pressing his lips to a historic Bible used at the inauguration of President Washington, the new president took the oath administered by Chief Justice [Edward Douglass] White. He had chosen the eighth verse from the sixth chapter of Micah, saying, ‘What doth the Lord require of thee but to do justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with thy God?’”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported from Washington, D.C., “Cheered by thousands here for his inaugural and by the hopes of countless millions in the four corners of the world, Franklin D. Roosevelt moved today to his place among the presidents. The new president spent the morning continuing the conferences on the bank situation and allied problems that he had held last night. Before he took the oath of office on the Capitol steps, he paused in the excitement of the day to pray in St. John’s Episcopal Church, just across Lafayette Square from the White House. Mr. Roosevelt, the members of his family and his cabinet, entered the church at 10:30 o’clock. Six minutes later, across the street in the White House, Herbert Hoover closed his desk, this simple act marking the end of his four years as president.”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment