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March 2: ON THIS DAY in 1954, Probe Communist link in Congress shooting

March 2, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Foes of President Roosevelt’s judiciary reorganization program today challenged the Administration to take the issue to the nation for a decision by any method of sounding public opinion. ‘We’re eager to put the question of enlarging the Supreme Court directly before the people,’ said Sen. Burton K. Wheeler (D., Montana), around whom Democratic and Republican opposition to the plan has centered. ‘The only one who would lose would be Mr. Roosevelt. He can’t win in the Senate today and no appeals to the country would change a single vote.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1939, the Eagle reported, “VATICAN CITY (A.P.) — Eugenio Cardinal Pacelli today was elected 262nd Pope of the Holy Roman Church on his 63rd birthday anniversary and assumed the name of Pius XII. The name under which the new Pontiff will be spiritual ruler of 331,500,000 Catholics was assumed in recognition of his succession to Pius XI, to whom he was Papal Secretary of State. The election of the eminent Italian cardinal on the third ballot of the first day of the conclave’s voting was without precedent in the modern history of the Church. Not since 1621, when Gregory XV was chosen, has a conclave acted so promptly. The new Pontiff has a thorough knowledge of the Church in the United States, where he was a visitor in October and November 1936. The election of Pope Pius XII shattered another tradition in that rarely has a Secretary of State to the preceding Pope been elevated to the Papal seat.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “CORREGIDOR (U.P.) — Gen. Douglas MacArthur landed on this ‘rock’ today, fulfilling his famous pledge: ‘I shall return.’ He stood ankle deep in rubble and ashes, turned over a burned Japanese skull with his toe, looked at it bitterly and exclaimed: ‘They made it tough for us, but it was a lot tougher for them.’ Here, on May 6, 1942, more than 30,000 sick and starving American troops surrendered to overwhelming Japanese forces. Here, less than two weeks ago, U.S. paratroops spearheaded a landing on the rocky fortress guarding the entrance to Manila Bay. MacArthur, in ceremonies at the Corregidor parade ground, paid tribute to the troops who wrested the ‘rock’ from the Japanese. He also paid high tribute to the fortress’ heroic defenders under Lt. Gen. Jonathan Wright three years ago. ‘I see the old flagpole still stands,’ MacArthur told Col. George M. Jones, commander of an honor guard of paratroopers. ‘Have your troops hoist the colors and let no enemy ever haul it down.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “TEHRAN (U.P.) — Communist mobs screaming ‘Yankee Go Home’ stoned three American military jeeps today in the third day of riots in a struggle for political power between Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and Premier Mohammad Mossadegh. The windshields of three U.S. mission jeeps were smashed, but no Americans were injured. Earlier today troops and police cleared Parliament Square in Tehran with tear gas after a Communist allegedly knifed a Mossadegh follower, student Ahmed Taleghani. The Nationalists tried to carry the 30-year-old student’s body into the Parliament building.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Swarms of police and plainclothesmen spread through the city today to protect members of Congress, President Eisenhower and the cabinet from possible new attacks by armed Puerto Rican terrorists. Congress met under a heavily reinforced police guard. Visitors were banned from House and Senate galleries unless they submit admission cards signed by a member of Congress. In the wake of the wild gun attack on House members by Puerto Rican Nationalists yesterday, extra security measures were extended dramatically throughout the Capital. Secret Service and White House police protection of Mr. Eisenhower was tightened, even though it’s never relaxed. S.S. men resumed a wartime station at the main gate of the White House. The White House uniformed force in the sentry booths around the Executive Mansion was alerted for the possibility that other Puerto Rican gunmen might be in the Capital area.”


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