Brooklyn Boro

February 23: ON THIS DAY in 1949, Israel and Egypt agree on truce

February 23, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1936, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “FREDERICKSBURG, VA., FEB. 22 (A.P.) — Regardless of what George Washington may have done, Walter Johnson converted legend into actuality today and threw a dollar across the Rappahannock. With a motion easier than that which he used to send his old speed ball steaming down the groove to batters, the former strikeout champion sailed two coins across the river. ‘Gosh!’ exclaimed Johnson, ‘I didn’t think I’d do it.’ The official toss cleared the ice-chunked river by 30 feet. Chief Judge Dr. H.J. Eckenrode, a Virginia historian, estimated the distance of the throw at 317 feet. Although he cleared the Rappahannock, Johnson’s pitch was 1,100 feet short of what Representative Bloom of New York said Washington’s toss would have been if he ever did it.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “RHODES (U.P.) — Israel and Egypt will sign tomorrow an armistice formally halting their hostilities in Palestine, United Nations officials announced today. The agreement may lead to a settlement of the long strife in the Holy Land. An announcement confirming the success of Dr. Ralph Bunche, acting U.N. mediator, in directing negotiations which produced an Israeli-Egyptian agreement, said the document would be signed at 10:30 a.m. (3:30 a.m. Brooklyn time). The text of the armistice, a compromise proposal submitted by Dr. Bunche to the Israeli and Egyptian delegations, will be made public 30 minutes after the formal signing ceremony. The 5,000-word armistice agreement comprised 12 chapters and three annexes. The chapters deal with military agreements for demilitarization and withdrawal of forces in the various areas of South Palestine, where Israeli-Egyptian fighting flared sporadically from the expiration of the British mandate last May until early this year.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “Brooklynites slipped and slithered and skidded — and crawled — their way to work over ice-coated streets and sidewalks more dangerous to life and limb than ever before within the memory of the oldest traffic policeman. A thin drizzle of rain, which started early last evening amid freezing temperatures, left a thick coating of ice on the street surfaces which only a sharp-spiked pedestrian could easily negotiate. As a result, automobiles — of the few that ventured out on the streets — constantly skidded into minor accidents, countless pedestrians lost their footing, subway and particularly elevated trains, slowed down by ice on the third rails, were as much as an hour behind time during the night though they later caught up with their schedules. At 6 a.m., Superintendent of Schools William Jansen, after a telephone conference with his district superintendents, ordered the school bus service, operated by the Children’s Bus Service at 1501 Voorhies Ave., suspended for the day to avert accidents. Police in patrol cars were instructed to tell any children they saw at street corners waiting for their school bus to go back home.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “There was a hint of a break in the city’s Asian Flu epidemic this week, a Health Department spokesman said yesterday. The number of pneumonia and Asian Flu deaths appeared to be lower in the early part of the week than they were for a similar period the preceding week — indicating a possible ‘leveling off’ of the epidemic, the spokesman said. However, he cautioned that figures for the week were not yet available and that it is too early to tell if there is a definite mortality decline. The spokesman revealed that pneumonia and Asian Flu deaths reached a peak with the week ending Feb. 16. There were a total of 167 pneumonia and Asian Flu deaths for the week, 90 more than the ‘normal’ rate for the time of year. Before last week, the average pneumonia and Asian Flu weekly death rate was about 108 or about 33 more than ‘normal.’ Last week brought the seven-week total for the year in pneumonia and Asian Flu deaths to 818, or 291 more than ‘normal.’ On Monday, Health Commissioner Dr. George James officially declared the outbreak in the city of epidemic proportions.”


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