Brooklyn Boro

January 27: ON THIS DAY in 1954, Big 3 confirm red China ban

January 27, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The battlefields of France, and, particularly, the grim visage of the great Somme struggle last September, were literally transported directly into the Brooklyn Hospital today, before the annual meeting of the Associated Physicians of Long Island, when Dr. Carroll Leja Nichols, neurologist of the hospital, showed in the person of one of the hospital’s patients how the terrific mental destruction of combat had reached out even over the seas and into Brooklyn. As it came before the conference of physicians, it was called merely ‘An Unusual Case of Aphasia.’ But it was more than that. It was the illustration of the wrecking of a mind here in Brooklyn merely by the sound of the backfiring of an automobile that brought back, by a strange association of ideas, the memories of two days spent by a Canadian soldier in a trench on the Somme front, buried up to the neck in shell debris and with the dead body of a brother pressed against his neck. The Canadian soldier came into the Brooklyn Hospital on January 16, his mind a blank. He had been found in a trance on Hanson place, near South Elliott place, and witnesses said he had dropped as if shot when an automobile in back of him had backfired while being started.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1936, the Eagle reported, “Radio amplifiers brought the encouraging voice of Borough President [Raymond] Ingersoll to 400 friends of the Brooklyn Visiting Nurses Association today as they gathered for a luncheon at the Hotel Bossert, which opened the association’s 1936 budget appeal for $175,000. Mr. Ingersoll, absent from the luncheon to extend the appeal through the facilities of WOR, pleaded for borough-wide support of the fund. ‘In keeping these nurses on the job each day we are making Brooklyn a healthier and safer place in which to live,’ he said. The nurses, he added, made 307,000 visits in 1935 and half of these were made without charge.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “An all-inclusive legislative investigation of the city’s entire transportation system, delving into transit unification and the financial dealings which brought it about, was demanded today by Assemblyman Eugene F. Bannigan, Brooklyn Democrat. The legislator, who is Democratic leader of the 11th A.D., earlier in the week served notice that he was drafting a resolution calling for a joint legislative committee investigation of the much-protested trolley car service in Brooklyn, but today he extended the scope of that resolution because, he said, ‘steady deterioration of the whole transit system has set in since unification.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN (U.P.) — The Western allies today unanimously confirmed their decision to reject all Soviet demands for world peace talks with Communist China. U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden and French Foreign Minister Georges Bidault also agreed to spurn an expected Soviet ‘compromise’ offer to restrict a Big Five conference with Red China to Asian problems. The three top Western diplomats further agreed to insist on settlement of the Korea issue before they even will consider a conference with the Red Chinese on specific local problems in Asia. Secretary Dulles, Mr. Eden and Mr. Bidault did not bar a meeting with the Reds indefinitely. They agreed that after the Korean dispute has been settled they will tell the Russians that perhaps they might consent to talks with Chinese Reds on specific issues as the war in Indo-China, but only with participation of the states directly affected. In the case of Indo-China, that would mean the three associated states of Laos, Vietnam and Cambodia, where loyal natives and French troops have been battling Communist-led rebels for seven costly years.”

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