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January 15: ON THIS DAY in 1963, Kennedy urges tax cut of $10 billion over 3 years

January 15, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1867, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Times frankly admits that the impeachment and removal of the President are party necessities. It calls attention to the fact that the extreme Radicals demanded President [Andrew] Johnson’s removal long before he had committed any of the acts which are now specified as forming the basis of the charges made against him. The Times goes further, and after quoting the opinions of leading Radicals in proof of its position, admits that if the President cannot be removed from office, the whole Radical scheme of reconstruction must be abandoned. In other words, if this revolutionary project cannot be carried through, the party of revolution must necessarily die with as much decency as it can assume.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1900, the Eagle reported, “’Dracula’ by Bram Stoker is the name of a book from the pen of the accomplished manager of the Lyceum Theater, London, and of the dramatic companies headed by Sir Henry Irving and Ellen Terry. The publishers are the Doubleday & McClure Company, New York, and the chaste and attractive work of the printer and binder is a worthy setting of the clear thought, the weird imagination and the reverential spirit of a volume of originality, interest and power. The story has been issued both in Great Britain and America for several weeks, but more than acknowledgement of its appearance has not yet been made in many quarters, for it requires, while it rewards, very careful reading, since its point of view or of treatment is novel, profound and startling.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “NEW DRINK — Recent mention here of the Brooklyn Cocktail has created some controversy. A young woman whose last name is Pinson writes that she (and not Art Arthur) devised the recipe for the original Brooklyn Cocktail: made of gin, grapefruit juice (not grape juice, whatever you do) and grenadine. However, Brad Dewey of Gage & Tollner’s, who is generally known as the originator and sponsor of the Brooklyn Cocktail, tells us that with the new year there is a new Brooklyn Cocktail, made as follows: Two-thirds real Jamaica rum, one-third lime juice and a dash of grenadine. He says that folks generally have switched to the new version.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1955, the Eagle reported, “Washington (U.P.) — The atomic-powered submarine Nautilus, first vehicle of any kind having nuclear power, will begin sea trials Monday. The Navy announced last night that the 2,800-ton vessel, built at a cost of more than $40,000,000, will leave the dock at Groton, Conn., and head down the Thames River for builder’s trials.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Washington (UPI) — On Monday, President Kennedy urged Congress to cut taxes $10 billion over the next three years to help take up the ‘persistent slack’ in the economy and strengthen this country’s free world leadership. He said the lawmakers should start this year with a slash of $6 billion in personal and corporate levies. This, he said, would stimulate business, encourage the risk-taking demanded by the free-enterprise system and help provide two million new jobs annually. Reaction from several key Democrats and Republicans — some on the tax-writing House Ways & Means Committee — indicated the President might have come up with a tax formula capable of winning broader support than originally believed. Doubts were expressed by some, however. The Chief Executive outlined his proposal in his third State of the Union address, a 5,500-word message delivered in person to a joint session of the House and Senate. It was carried to the nation on radio and television. The Chief Executive, speaking carefully and confidently as Mrs. Kennedy looked on from the packed House galleries, drew applause when he mentioned his tax program and again when he said the immediate danger had eased in Cuba. But the hand-clapping trailed off quickly after that, possibly because the congressmen were not armed with advance copies of his address and could not anticipate his punch lines.”


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