Brooklyn Boro

January 13: ON THIS DAY in 1953, Moscow acts to purge Jews

January 13, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1916, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Fourth Avenue Subway Extension to Eighty-sixth street will be opened to the public Saturday afternoon. This was announced last night at the meeting of the Subway Celebration Committee, 7825 Fifth avenue. The first official trip over the line will consume ten minutes, the train leaving the Municipal Building, Manhattan, at 2 o’clock and arriving at the Eighty-sixth street station ten minutes after. The regular schedule time will be 18 minutes for this distance, the trains running on a five-minute headway. This is promised. Peter Donnelly, chairman of the dinner committee, reported that arrangements have been made to accommodate about 250 persons at the dinner, which will be held at the Ridge Club. William B. Hatfield proposed to the members present that motion pictures of the celebration should be taken. He said that this would be the greatest of advertisements for Bay Ridge.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1939, the Eagle reported, “Col. Jacob Ruppert, who made his father’s brewery the largest in the world and with the profits bought himself the world’s champion baseball team and New York City real estate second in value only to the fabulous Astor holdings, died today at the age of 71. His last words, said weakly at 7 p.m. yesterday when he was removed from his oxygen tent for an hour, were, ‘I want to see Ruth.’ But Babe Ruth, who won world fame as a player under Ruppert’s aegis, was already there. He had called a half hour earlier. His words were, ‘I want to see the Colonel.’ The two, owner and player, looked at each other for a moment, smiled and clasped hands. ‘Hello, Babe,’ said Ruppert. Then the nurses put the colonel back in the tent … He resented his illness, not because of fear, but because doctors forbade him to leave his bed to watch his Yankees defeat the Chicago Cubs in the last World Series, to win the championship for the third [straight] time.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — Russia today took its first step toward what may become an Iron Curtain purge of Jews rivaling that of the German Nazis. Six of nine leading Russian physicians arrested on charges of murdering two Soviet leaders and plotting to murder five high military officers are Jews. The Jewish doctors, the Communists asserted, were recruited by the ‘espionage Zionist organization’ — the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee — and were paid by the American Intelligence Service. The other three doctors were alleged to be agents of the British Intelligence Service. It was indicated strongly that the defendants were members of the staff of the Kremlin’s own hospital where top-level leaders, including Stalin, are treated. The physicians apparently were members of the Kremlin’s ‘sanitary and health service.’ It was noted that Stalin made a public appearance last night when he attended a concert at the Bolshoi Theater. Diplomatic sources expressed belief that his attendance might have been planned to forestall any rumors that his life was involved in the alleged plot. Moscow said the physicians had confessed after ‘interrogation.’ It was believed they would be made the victims of a big Moscow show trial.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1955, the Eagle reported, “The U.S. Patent Office today has officially recognized Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., of Brooklyn, as discoverer of tetracycline, newest of the broad spectrum of antibiotics, ending a five-firm dispute over rights to its production. It issued a patent including 18 claims covering manufacture, use and sale of the wonder drug and its derivatives, as well as processes for their manufacture and for antibiotic compositions containing these materials. The award settles a year-old controversy during which two suits had been pressed before the Patent Office. In one last February, Lederle Laboratories conceded priority to Pfizer and received a license to produce the drug as part of the settlement. Following announcement from Washington, Pfizer said it was starting legal proceedings in Federal District Court, Atlanta, against Bristol Laboratories, E.R. Squibb & Co., and Upjohn Co., charging patent infringement and seeking treble damages and an injunction prohibiting their unlicensed manufacture of the drug. Pfizer markets its product under the trade name Tetracyn.”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment