Brooklyn Boro

December 30: ON THIS DAY in 1944, 100,00 Yanks rip Nazi bulge

December 30, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Broadway and Times Square associations have sent a long communication to the Public Service Commission, urging the great importance of the B.R.T. establishing an express station at Times Square, when the new subway system is completed. Attention is called to the great amount of traffic that is done at Forty-second street and Broadway, much of it from Brooklyn, on account of this point being in the heart of the theatrical district. ‘What is likely to occur if the B.R.T. has no express station at Forty-second street is illustrated nightly on the present subway,’ says the communication. ‘Since Times Square station is only a local, the thousands of theatergoers have to transfer from and to the expresses at Seventy-second street and the Grand Central stations. As the rush hours approach, there is a greater and greater congestion at these transfer points.’”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Eagle reported, “Richard Barthelmess’ newest production, ‘Scarlet Seas,’ is the photoplay attraction at the Brooklyn Strand this week. This is the first Barthelmess picture to be synchronized with music and sound. It presents the star in a role of a wanderer of the Seven Seas. He shanghaies the girl of his choice, takes her aboard his ship and out to sea. One of the thrilling incidents is a shipwreck in midocean. Betty Compson plays the feminine lead. Loretta Young also has an important role … On the surrounding program are a Walt Disney animated sound cartoon, the first of the new ‘Mickey Mouse’ series; the Mark Strand Topical Review and Movietone News. The Vitaphone short subjects include Brown and Whitaker in ‘In the Park’ and Blossom Seeley.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “PARIS (U.P.) — Lt. Gen. George S. Patton hurled more than 100,000 troops and hundreds of tanks into his spreading counteroffensive against the southern wall of the Ardennes salient today and drove an armored wedge halfway across the Nazi pocket to within 12 miles of the United States 1st Army spearheads in the north. Rolling northward with increasing speed all along their 45-mile attack front, Patton’s armored columns hammered out gains of one to six miles in 24 hours and drove the Nazis back across the Luxembourg border into Germany on a six-mile stretch of their right flank. Patton’s most dangerous thrust, however, was ripping across the waist of the extended German salient northwest of Bastogne, threatening tens of thousands of Nazi troops stalled in the western end of the bulge.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “DUBLIN (U.P.) — Ray Bradbury, a leading American chronicler of the fictional future, admitted today he shuns the most commonplace inventions in present-day use. Bradbury, whose stories are full of men from Mars and spaceships, doesn’t own an automobile, wouldn’t take a television set as a gift and only installed a telephone as a result of determined pressure from his Hollywood agent.”

***

-->

ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle reported, “MIAMI (UPI) — President Kennedy told 40,000 emotion-choked Cubans yesterday that the proud battle flag of Brigade 2506 — the contingent that staged the abortive Bay of Pigs invasion — will one day fly over a ‘Free Havana.’ The President’s wife, Jacqueline, followed him to the speakers’ stand and brought down the house by delivering a brief, touching speech in Spanish. Many in the huge assemblage dabbed at their eyes with handkerchiefs when, after gazing over the ransomed prisoners, the first lady said simply: ‘It is an honor for me to be today with a group of the bravest men in the world.’ The drama unfolded in Miami’s huge Orange Bowl stadium, where more than 1,200 khaki-uniformed survivors of the ill-fated invasion stood at stiff attention for 30 minutes while the president slowly reviewed the ranks, stopping to talk to about every third man. Kennedy told the crowd the Brigade’s ‘conduct and valor are proof that although [Fidel] Castro and his fellow dictators may rule nations, they do not rule people; that they may imprison bodies, but they do not imprison spirits; that they may destroy the exercise of liberty, but they cannot eliminate the determination to be free.’”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment