Brooklyn Boro

December 21: ON THIS DAY in 1944, Germans race on

December 21, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1842, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Professor [Samuel] Morse has his eletro-magnetic telegraph established between two of the committee rooms in the Capitol at Washington, and it is there attracting much attention. The inventor is desirous of obtaining assistance from Congress to bring his invention into practical operation.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1853, the Eagle reported, “CORRECTION — We stated in Monday’s paper that the residents of Yellow Hook, in the town of New Utrecht, at a public meeting, had resolved to change the name of the place to ‘Bay Bridge,’ and that ‘Thomas G. Bergen’ presided at the meeting; it should have read ‘Bay Ridge,’ and ‘Tunis E. Bergen’ presided.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1860, the Eagle published the following advertisement: “South Carolina has seceded from the Union, but James Wm. Hunter has not seceded from keeping on hand a large stock of the purest Liquor that can be got in market, which he offers at 25 per cent cheaper than any other house in Brooklyn. Call and see his stock. No. 76 Fulton street, Brooklyn.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1866, the Eagle reported, “John Gray, one of the soldiers of the Revolution, of whom nothing has heretofore been publicly known, is living in Noble Co., Ohio. He is one hundred and three years old; was born in Fairfax County, Va., and enlisted in the Continental army in 1781, serving for three months, taking part in one minor engagement, and being honorably discharged at the end of this term. His period of service was so short that he is not entitled to a pension under any existing law. He has been unable to support himself for the last seventeen years, and his neighbors now ask Congress to give him a special pension.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “PARIS (U.P.) — Reinforced American troops rallied to stem a potentially disastrous German breakthrough on the northern flank of the Belgian salient today, but the Nazis’ main armored forces to the south were reported rolling forward through the Ardennes at a pace that may already have carried halfway across Luxembourg. A swelling tide of American troops, tanks and guns moved steadily forward to the threatened front and it was indicated that the threat of catastrophe overhanging the United States 1st Army for five days had at least momentarily been averted. An official headquarters statement, suggesting strongly that no major breakthrough had yet been achieved by the Nazis, said any favorable or unfavorable news of ‘sensational’ impact would be released immediately. There was no ‘sensational’ announcement this morning and headquarters clung to its policy of revealing less spectacular developments 48 hours old. It was acknowledged at headquarters, however, that American arms had suffered their worst defeat since the fall of the Philippines in 1942 and that the battle, already one of the bloodiest in the United States’ military history, had still not reached its peak.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle reported, “BRIDGEPORT, CONN. (UPI) — Two senators and a congressman today joined Radio Station WICC in its campaign to persuade the National Football League to lift a television blackout on the Dec. 30 championship game between the New York Giants and the Green Bay Packers. Sen.-Elect Abraham A. Ribicoff, D-Conn., sent a telegram to NFL president Pete Rozelle today urging him to reconsider his decision to black out New York City and parts of Connecticut from television coverage of the game. Ribicoff said the blackout is a ‘disservice to thousands of loyal football fans.’ Sen. Thomas J. Dodd, D-Conn., sent a similar message, saying the lifting of the television blackout would ‘create more fans for the Giants.’”


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