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December 9: ON THIS DAY in 1941, N.Y.-bound enemy planes alarm entire Northeast

December 9, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “CHICAGO – Four committees of the American Public Health Association were chosen today to organize the work of teaching cities and communities to prevent or control outbreaks of influenza. The nominating committee will announce the composition of these communities at the first general session of the forty-sixth annual meeting tonight. One committee will complete statistics on the recent influenza epidemic, another will devise and circulate the best known measures of prevention, another will handle measures of relief for convalescents, and the fourth will investigate vaccines and serum. ‘The chief effort of this annual meeting will be to organize our coming year’s work along the lines of these four committees,’ said Dr. Lee K. Frankel of New York, treasurer of the association. ‘These committees are to act in the interest of public health boards and officials all over the country and standardize, if possible, the means of preventing another such epidemic as the one now passing.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “New York City, and the entire Northeast Coast, today had its first air raid alarm. New Yorkers found themselves in the midst of what they had heard about in reports from Europe and Asia, more recently the Pacific Islands and the West Coast. Enemy planes were approaching Long Island — from New England and then from off the Virginia coast. Bombers, apparently, were heading for the Brooklyn Navy Yard, for Mitchell Field and other points. Reports were confusing, but the defense organizations, in view of what had happened in Hawaii, were taking no chances. Interceptor planes took to the air from Mitchell Field to seek out the enemy. Air raid sirens were sounded. Schools were closed. Employees were sent home. Police warned pedestrians to keep off crowded streets. At 1:45 p.m., the police sounded the all-clear signal and a minute later the Fire Department followed suit. But at 2 p.m. the air-raid alarm was renewed by both departments, a minute apart. Police announced the second all-clear at 2:41 p.m.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — Princess Elizabeth wants to decide for herself who she will marry and when. Elizabeth’s ideas on the subject of marriage were presented in a book called ‘Queen of Tomorrow’ by Louis Wulff, correspondent at Buckingham Palace for 18 years for the British Press Association. He said idle talk about the future consort of the future queen was virtually the only thing the Princess resented about her public position. There have been recurrent stories that the Princess has made her choice and that it is Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, a nephew of King George of the Hellenes, but Buckingham Palace has denied any engagement. ‘The plain fact is that up to the present there is and has been no basis whatever for any of these rumors (about marriage to various persons) which serve no good purpose but merely tend to distress the Princess and make her all the more determined to insist that her right to some privacy in her own life shall be respected, all the more rightly intolerant of any attempts to intrude upon it,’ Wulff wrote.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Supreme Court today takes up one of the most explosive issues in American life at an historic hearing on the constitutionality of racial segregation in public schools. Two famed attorneys, one Negro and one white, are pitted against each other in the courtroom drama which climaxes a 30-year legal fight by Negro groups. Before the high tribunal are five separate cases, all raising the same question: Does the mere fact of segregation put the stamp of inequality on Negro students, even if they are provided school facilities as good as those provided for white children? The oral arguments will run into tomorrow and perhaps Thursday. On the court’s decision — which may not come for several weeks — depends the continuance of the South’s time-honored doctrine of ‘separate but equal’ educational systems for the two races … Key Negro lawyer is Thurgood Marshall, 44, New York, representing the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People … Elderly, white-haired John W. Davis, one-time Democratic candidate for President, represents South Carolina.”


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