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November 18: ON THIS DAY in 1933, Roosevelt hails Soviet pact as aid to peace of world

November 18, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1863, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The National Cemetery at Gettysburg, where the honored dead in the great battle sleep their last sleep, will be solemnly dedicated on Thursday, the 19th instant. The Governors of all the Northern States have been invited and many of them have already reached Harrisburg, among them Governor [Horatio] Seymour of this State. The North-western States will also be represented but not so fully, while there will be present, should circumstances on the Rapidan admit, General [George] Meade and many of the officers and delegations of men from all the corps who participated in the fight. The soldiers of the War of 1812 and the war with Mexico are also urgently invited to be present in a body. The ceremonies promise to be of a most imposing character.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “During the past forty-eight hours, 345 influenza cases were reported at the Health Department, while 90 persons died from the disease during the same period. The reports on the epidemic showed that the disease is gradually decreasing. Sunday’s figures showed a decrease of 96 cases under Saturday and 1 less today than Sunday. Pneumonia is also on the decrease. Sunday there were 46 cases reported, against 77 for Saturday, and for today only 39 cases were reported. Sunday 52 persons died from pneumonia and 39 died overnight.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “SAVANNAH, GA. (A.P.) — President [Franklin] Roosevelt today hailed Russian recognition as a world aid and to the people of Georgia he expressed scorn of the ‘Doubting Thomases’ on his gold-control monetary program. Before a throng assembled at the spacious municipal stadium, Mr. Roosevelt put forward his Russian and monetary programs and received the applause of the sun-warmed citizens. ‘I believe sincerely,’ said the President, ‘that the most impelling motive that has lain behind the conversations which were successfully concluded yesterday between Russia and the United States was desire of both countries for peace and for the strengthening of the peaceful purpose of the civilized world.’ Mr. Roosevelt struck out at the critics of his monetary plans with these words: ‘It has been remarked of late by certain tories that those who are today in charge of your national Government are guilty of great experimentation. If I read my history right, the same suggestion was used when Englishmen, protesting in vain against intolerable conditions at home, founded new colonies in the American wilderness, and when Washington and Adams and Bullochs conducted another great experiment in 1776.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “PARIS (U.P.) — Lt. Gen. George S. Patton’s American 3rd Army, pacing five other Allied armies in a mighty ‘victory now’ offensive along a 400-mile front, crashed into Germany near the Luxembourg border and launched a great climactic assault on the French fortress city of Metz today. The American 1st and 9th armies, already inside Germany on a 20-mile front on both sides of Aachen, pounded eastward across the Cologne plain within 28 miles of the Rhine River against stiffening enemy resistance. At the southern end of the front, the French 1st Army captured the enemy stronghold of Montbeliard and plunged into the historic Belfort Gap within 25 miles of the Rhine and Bavaria. British 2nd Army forces, holding down the northern sector, cleared the west bank of the Maas River before Roermond in Southeast Holland and carved out two bridgeheads across the Derivation of Zig Canal to raise a new threat to Venlo, 14 miles northeast of Roermond. Patton’s vanguards pushed across the border into Germany’s Saar Basin in the vicinity of Perl, one mile inside the Reich near the junction of French, Luxembourg and German borders.”


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