Brooklyn Boro

October 26: ON THIS DAY in 1962, Kennedy rejects plea to drop blockade as Khrushchev agrees to stop Cuba arms shipments

October 26, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1916, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Mrs. Margaret Sanger, the birth control advocate who recently opened the first birth control clinic in the United States, at 46 Amboy street, Brownsville, was placed under arrest shortly before 2 o’clock this afternoon, and a half hour later was dragged, protesting, into a patrol wagon by Detectives Mooney and Boylan. Mrs. Sanger was in a towering rage and generally abusive. She refused point blank to walk into the station house. When the patrol wagon arrived, she hung back and was dragged to the steps of the vehicle. There she paused and asked permission to make a speech. It was denied her. As the detectives again began to use force, she cried out: ‘Is this what you call America?’ The rest of her tirade was lost in the whirr of the motor as the police chauffeur threw on the clutch and the wagon rushed through the protesting crowd. Miss Fanny Mindell, Mrs. Sanger’s assistant, was also arrested. Both are charged with a violation of Section 1142 of the Penal Laws.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “The circulation department of the Brooklyn Public Libraries has ordered all outside circulation of books to be stopped during the influenza epidemic. The order, originated by the Board of Health, and taken up with the library officials, went into effect at noon at the Public Library on Fifth Ave., Manhattan. All other branches followed and, until the epidemic slackens, books will be received but none will be taken out. The libraries will remain open and all books may be used inside the buildings.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “Dwight D. Eisenhower charged last night that Gov. Adlai E. Stevenson has a ‘soothing and appeasing formula’ for dealing with Russia that would encourage Soviet aggression and bring on war wider in scale than the Korean conflict. The Republican nominee used as the text for his special statement Stevenson’s own words, spoken last May in a San Francisco speech. Eisenhower said they showed that the Democratic candidate had a foreign policy of ‘uncertain purpose and feeble will.’ The statement came at the end of a day in which Eisenhower attempted to chip away at the heavily Democratic Negro vote. At an outdoor rally in Harlem attended by about 10,000 persons, he declared that the Democratic civil rights program was nothing but some ‘pretty shopworn’ promises. Eisenhower said that Stevenson’s San Francisco speech proposed a ‘soothing and appeasing formula for meeting Soviet Communism.’ ‘I believe,’ he said, ‘that such a policy – with its beguiling panaceas, placating international deals and implied appeasement — would encourage aggression. Furthermore, I believe that it would invite on a wider scale the kind of tragedy that now afflicts us in Korea.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Eagle reported, “The Brooklyn Civil Defense is on a 24-hour alert during the Cuban crisis and has set up a control center with a radio room. According to Major Paul Rafferty and Joseph Grimes, both of Civil Defense Headquarters in Brooklyn, CD has a list of several hundred trained volunteers who will be called on in case of emergency. Major Rafferty says CD would prefer not to enlist untrained civilians at present. He feels the staff he has now is adequate. One of the brochures released by CD points out that the central area of the ground floor of a heavily constructed apartment building, with concrete floors, is apt to provide more fallout protection than the ordinary basement of a family dwelling. Usually, areas in apartment houses are designated as Shelter Areas. The brochure also says that a below-ground basement in a private home can cut fallout radiation to one-tenth of the outside level. The safest place is the basement corner least exposed to windows and deepest below ground. Leaflets and pamphlets concerning fallout shelters and containing information on radioactivity can be obtained from the local CD information bureau at Grand Army Plaza and the Office of the Director of Civil Defense in the Municipal Building, in Boro Hall.”


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