Brooklyn Boro

October 15: ON THIS DAY in 1953, China PWs defy brainwash, heap abuse on Red quizzers

October 15, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “ROCKVILLE CENTRE, L.I. — Through the generosity of Mrs. James O’Day of Rockville Centre, an emergency hospital for influenza cases has been opened at 10 Rodney place. The building, owned by Mrs. O’Day, is a large and beautiful homestead. With the assistance of the women of St. Agnes R.C. Church parish, it has been completely remodeled and equipped. The hospital will be in the charge of Mother Mary Petre. A number of physicians have volunteered their services. At present, 20 cots have been installed. Mrs. O’Day is a well known playwright and author and is one of the most popular residents of Rockville Centre.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “SAN FRANCISCO, OCT. 14 — Gov. John W. Bricker of Ohio told the United States tonight that it was being ‘taken for a ride’ by President Roosevelt’s ‘court packing,’ which thrust ‘bedlam and confusion’ upon every court in the land. The fresh, young blood Mr. Roosevelt promised the Supreme Court in 1937, he said, turned out to be nothing but ‘New Deal plasma.’ The sole reason for the present court situation, Bricker said, was the smashing of the constitutional barrier to remaking the United States Government ‘similar to State socialism.’ The Republican Vice Presidential candidate, in a major speech prepared for delivery here as part of his party assignment to win over California and its 25 electoral votes for the G.O.P., hammered out one of the hardest criticisms of the American court system yet addressed to the American people. Bricker pointed out that Mr. Roosevelt appointed 165 of the 275 judges of the Supreme Court, Circuit Court of Appeals and the District courts. Only two of the Roosevelt appointees were Republicans, he said, while a ‘large number were active New Dealers,’ some of whom previously had been ‘repudiated at the polls.’ These appointees, he charged, ‘inevitably clothed their decisions with their personal philosophies’ and ‘turned the courts into conclaves of New Deal ideology.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “PANMUNJOM (U.P.) — Heavily armed Indian guards today forced anti-Red Chinese sitdown strikers to attend the first Communist lectures, but the prisoners rejected repatriation in overwhelming numbers. For seven hours the violently anti-Communist war prisoners of the Allies refused to leave their compounds. They came out quietly when they were told their Indian guards would use force if necessary. The Indians, carrying rifles and swinging nightsticks, herded the first group of 22,418 prisoners into the miniature tent city built by American engineers on an around-the-clock schedule. Only 10 of the 500 Chinese interviewed by Communist political officers today decided to return to Red rule. The others held firm to their anti-Communist stand. The first day of “counter-brainwashing” ended at 6:30 p.m. (4:30 a.m. Brooklyn time). The 10 who accepted repatriation were turned over to the Reds. The neutral nations repatriation commission said 1,000 North Koreans will be interviewed by Communist ‘explainers’ tomorrow … The dismal failure of the Communists in their first attempt to lure the prisoners back to Red rule had been forecast by the defiant behavior of the men … ‘Father Mao (Chinese dictator Mao Tse-tung) wants you back,’ a Red brainwasher told the prisoners. Most of the prisoners screamed that the Communists knew what they could do with ‘Father Mao.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “STOCKHOLM (U.P.) — The coveted Nobel prize for literature today was awarded to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who is credited with ‘mobilizing’ the English language during World War II. It was an open secret that the 78-year-old Churchill, who has dedicated his remaining years to the cause of world peace, would have preferred the Nobel peace prize. But he was genuinely moved, friends said, when informed of his selection for the world’s highest literary distinction. Churchill’s choice by the Swedish Academy of Literature, over such contenders as America’s Ernest Hemingway, is worth $33,840 in prize money. The designation was made a month earlier than usual to enable Churchill to come to Stockholm in person to receive the prize from King Gustav Adolf on Dec. 10. Churchill, the first active statesman to be chosen for the award, received the prize for his war memoirs, ‘The Second World War.’”


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