Brooklyn Boro

October 2: ON THIS DAY in 1954, Giants whet scalping knife!

October 2, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “We are told that Dr. William H. Park, city bacteriologist, has discovered a vaccine against Spanish influenza, which is now being tried out on volunteers, and if approved may soon be distributed in small amounts to physicians. Health Commissioner Copeland apparently has faith in it or he would not have made any public statement. But about the tests he declares, ‘I cannot say what the effects have been.’ Now, the growing public apprehension about this communicable disease makes us all hope that a protective vaccine has really been discovered. It renders scientists particularly eager to make such a discovery. If influenza bacilli, killed by exposure to heat and then suspended in a salt solution, will offer a certainty that an inoculated person will not take the disease and will do no harm to the human system, then the blessing to mankind is immense. Both these points require time for demonstration. But eager scientists, incapable of deliberately deceiving the public or fellow physicians, honest, conscientious men, may be easily self-deceived. We cannot believe that this peril is ignored or minimized by the authorities. On the other hand, we think it is first in the mind of Dr. Royal S. Copeland, the head of the Health Department, and that the public can depend on his skill and judgment to avoid any serious error in the application of a new treatment.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1928, the Eagle reported, “Convention Hall, Rochester — Because of the aid his name, prestige, Protestantism and non-Tammany background will bring to Alfred E. Smith’s candidacy for president, Franklin D. Roosevelt was nominated for governor on the Democratic ticket at noon today. The nomination was unanimous and viva voce. The party machine having picked its candidate, the delegates to the Democratic State Convention had nothing to do but ratify the choice. Mayor [Jimmy] Walker of New York City placed Mr. Roosevelt in nomination and Public Service Commissioner George R. Lunn seconded the nomination.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “The Hugo L. Black-Ku Klux Klan fight has only just begun, in the opinion of many well-informed Washington observers. The new Supreme Court justice’s sensational radio address last night, estimated to have been heard by upwards of 31,000,000 persons, received a widely varying reception among high Government officials, but the majority still remained critical. Although no plans were announced by the leaders of the battle on Black’s appointment, there was a definite hint of impeachment proceedings in one quarter … In the meantime the new justice is preparing to take his place on the bench of the highest court in the land on Monday when it reconvenes after its usual Summer recess … President Roosevelt, whose statement on the case at the White House some time ago was believed responsible for Mr. Black’s finally taking cognizance of the charge that he is a life member of the Klan, did not hear the broadcast.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “CLEVELAND — With a bright and shining chance to wrap up the World Series in four straight, Leo Durocher, manager of the New York Giants, will send a spot pitcher to the mound against the dazed Cleveland Indians in Municipal Stadium here today. He is Don Liddle, the undersized lefthander who pitched only 126 innings as the Giants won the National League pennant and finished with a record of nine victories and four defeats. The way the 51st World Series has turned, Liddle is just as likely to do it as anyone else. In fact, he is the logical choice in the rather thin line of New York starting pitchers. At the age of 37, Sal Maglie, who opened the series for the Giants, would find it rather tough to come back with only two days of rest. Al Lopez, harassed manager of the Indians, goes back to his first game starter in Bob Lemon, but is prepared to use any member of his big, beautiful company of chuckers in an effort to keep Cleveland’s desperate hope alive. For if the Indians go quietly in four straight, the club must turn back a huge chunk of tickets long since sold for the fifth game.”


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