Brooklyn Boro

September 24: ON THIS DAY in 1949, Red blast sparks atom race

September 24, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Dr. Copeland, Health Commissioner, said that during the last twenty-hour hours ending at 10 a.m. today, 150 additional cases of Spanish influenza had been reported. Of these, 81 come under the jurisdiction of city authorities and 69 were government cases. They are divided among the boroughs as follows: Manhattan, 43 cases, of which 2 are soldiers; Bronx, 7; Brooklyn, 27; Queens, 4; and Richmond, 2. The Navy Yard in Brooklyn reported 12 additional cases and 47 additional cases in Brooklyn are confined to immigrants arriving from foreign ports. The Marine Hospital in Staten Island reported 8 cases.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “Interest in the Grand Jury investigation into alleged ‘throwing’ of baseball games by dishonest players switched today from Chicago to Cleveland. With the Grand Jury adjourned until next Tuesday, investigators, baseball magnates and fans are watching the White Sox, for their victory or defeat in the series with the league-leading Indians at Cleveland may decide the future course of the investigation. If the White Sox win today, they will displace Cleveland and lead the league by half a game. Ban Johnson, president of the American League, is reported to have received rumors that gamblers are trying to create an impression that the White Sox do not dare win the league pennant. According to statements quoting Mr. Johnson, the syndicate of gamblers which, it has been charged, ‘bought’ last year’s World Series by paying $100,000 to five White Sox players, threatens to expose the plot if the Chicago team wins the race.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1931, the Eagle reported, “Attendance at city schools today showed a substantial increase over the figures for the opening day, Tuesday, Superintendent of Schools O’Shea disclosed. From statistics his staff gathered yesterday, Dr. O’Shea said that the city average of pupils being kept away from school because of the infantile paralysis scare had dropped to 8.8 percent. On Tuesday it was more than 11 percent.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “Washington (U.P.) — The Russian atomic blast set off an atomic arms race in which American experts said today the Soviets may never catch up. The race for A-bombs between the cold war champions of the East and the West was blasted into the open by history’s ninth atomic explosion, somewhere in Russia. At stake may be the future of civilization. Atomic scientists reported that the Soviets now are about where the United States was at the time of the first A-bomb test explosion at Alamogordo, N.M., in 1945. The U.S. has gone a long way since then … Top diplomats said it is possible, but not probable, that Russia wants war. They said our aim, in any event, continues to be establishment of a lasting world peace.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “The New York American League Club, seeking to bolster its already strong infield, corralled 18-year-old switch-hitting shortstop Mickey Charles Mantle, who was the property of the Joplin, Mo., farm team. He worked out with the Yankees on their recent western trip. The lad is being touted as another Honus Wagner.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — For more than 30 years, the late Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson served his state and country with distinction. But he left an estate of only $1,163 when he died. Although no one considered Vinson rich, the size of his estate shocked the Capital. An old friend, Senator Walter F. George (D-Ga.), was moved to reflect: ‘The man who gives his whole life to public service gives little to his family. That is true of all men in America who are dedicated to public service rather than service to themselves.’ The jurist’s estate — filed in Probate Court here yesterday — listed his assets at $7,163, including his car, personal jewelry, some cash, a few government bonds, and even his law books. Against this were debts totaling $6,000, leaving a net worth of only $1,163 … Vinson died Sept. 8 of a heart attack after a lifetime of government service. As Chief Justice he received a salary of $25,500 a year.”


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