Brooklyn Boro

September 22: ON THIS DAY in 1915, 6 killed, 60 injured as crowded street car plunges into subway hole

September 22, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1907, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Under lowering clouds, but with the spirit of revelry still unsubdued, gay, blithesome, rollicking Coney Island last night tripped and danced and cavorted and capered out the season of 1907. Just as officially the carnival of Mardi Gras ended on Friday night, so the pleasure ground of the greater city will not officially close until tonight when the myriad lights in Dreamland and Luna Park are extinguished to be turned on no more this year, but in the minds of the public whose patronage makes Coney Island possible, both the festival and the season ended last night, and thousands of people gathered there from far and near to participate in the celebration. It was a very different going out from that which was chronicled last year. Then the Mardi Gras festival culminated in a series of semi-riots, which sent scores to hospitals and more to the police stations. Disorder reigned supreme. But last night the crowds, though numbering nearly 200,000 and possessed of the hilarious spirit, were contented to confine their frolicking to limits within the law.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1915, the Eagle reported, “A street car jammed to the doors with passengers, most of them working girls, dropped into the bowels of the earth at Seventh avenue and Twenty-fourth street, Manhattan, today, when the subway construction work at that point collapsed. The surface of the street disappeared for a distance of two blocks, leaving a gaping hole thirty feet deep, seventy-five feet wide and six hundred feet long. In the debris that was carried down like an avalanche, between seventy-five and a hundred persons, if not more, were buried. Within an hour after the first firemen and policemen arrived at the scene, six bodies had been discovered and more than sixty men and women, most of them seriously injured, had been laid on the floors of nearby buildings. There were many laborers at work in the excavation when the street fell in upon them, and at least four of them were killed outright. How many more perished could not be told, but there was reason to believe that most of them escaped death. The police and firemen believed that a number who it was impossible to reach must be pinned under the mountains of timbers and jagged iron pipes.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO — Grand jury investigation of alleged gambling by baseball players in last year’s World Series between the Chicago American and Cincinnati National League clubs, and of charges that the Philadelphia-Chicago National League game of Aug. 31 was ‘fixed’ for Philadelphia to win, began here yesterday. A dozen baseball officials, players and writers had been subpoenaed and it was announced that others probably would be called before the hearing was concluded.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1931, the Eagle reported, “City schools belatedly threw open their doors to 1,250,000 pupils today, but an estimated 80,000 in the lower grammar grades stayed away. They stayed away, school officials believed, because of the infantile paralysis scare. Miss Lizzie E. Rector, district superintendent in Bay Ridge and Bensonhurst, reported ’10 percent of the children were kept away’ in elementary and junior high schools. A physician, she said, informed her he was keeping his two children out until Oct. 15. In Flatbush, Dr. James J. Reynolds thought the number staying away ‘might be 10 percent or might be 20 percent.’ In Flatbush, the more well-to-do people are keeping their children out of town until around Oct. 1.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “Byron (Whizzer) White, Rhodes scholar All-America from Colorado U. now playing with the Pittsburgh Pirates, and four other first-year men are among the leaders in the National Football League, according to statistics released today. White is tied for first in scoring with 18 points, second in ground gaining with 118 yards, and tied for third in pass receiving with seven catches for 88 yards.” White was the runner-up for the 1937 Heisman Trophy. He had a short but successful NFL career and then attended Yale Law School. From 1962 to 1993, he was an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. He was succeeded on the bench by Brooklyn native Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died last week at age 87.


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