Brooklyn Boro

September 15: ON THIS DAY in 1922, Turks massacre 2,000 as Smyrna burns

September 15, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Rumors that Spanish influenza is prevalent in Brooklyn have been going the rounds for the last two days. The sudden change from hot to cold weather last week did cause many cases of influenza in the borough and elsewhere, but the truth of the matter, according to Dr. Royal S. Copeland, Commissioner of Health, is that the influenza is of the local variety. The Health Department has recorded 171 cases of Spanish influenza since the first of July, a small number which were brought into Brooklyn from a steamer arriving at ‘an Atlantic port.’ No new cases of the Spanish variety have developed in the community, with the exception of twenty-eight cases which have developed in the last two weeks and all of which are being treated at the Willard Parker Hospital. The death rate from pneumonia has been on the decrease of late, and since pneumonia is almost invariably associated with the more serious cases of influenza, Dr. Copeland points out that there is no occasion for any fear of a widespread epidemic.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1922, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (AP) — From 1,000 to 2,000 Christians had been massacred in Smyrna by the Turks before the fire which swept the Armenian and other quarters of the Asia Minor seaport recently evacuated by the Greek army, it is charged in semi-official and other Greek messages from Athens received here today. Among the Turkish outrages was the carrying off of many girl pupils of the American Girls College, it is alleged. An American destroyer which has arrived at Piraeus, Greece, reports that the Turks entered the British Consulate at Smyrna and murdered an official there who was assembling the archives, says a Reuters dispatch from Athens today. Postmaster Wilkinson is also said to have been murdered as well as other Englishmen. Sir Harry Lamb, the Consul General, is believed to have escaped on board a warship. The admiral commanding the British squadron at Smyrna has warned the Turkish authorities in the city that if the massacres are continued, the Turkish quarters will be bombarded, says an Exchange Telegraph dispatch from Athens.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “Mayor [William] O’Dwyer vigorously attacked opponents of federal aid for parochial schools today as he welcomed Democratic delegates slated to nominate former Gov. Herbert H. Lehman, who supported Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt in her stand on such aid, for the U.S. Senate. The Mayor said flatly that the proposed Barden Federal school aid bill, which would exempt Catholic and other religious schools, discriminated against 400,000 New York City parochial school pupils … Mayor O’Dwyer introduced the question as ‘controversial — though why it is, I do not know,’ he said. ‘These parochial schools have not cost the city, state or nation a penny. They build them, they maintain them, they pay for the teachers. And the money comes out of the pockets of people who also pay the general taxes.’ He added that he did not see how ‘any constitutional government could justify’ a law such as the Barden bill, adding, ‘We want more and more federal aid for these children.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “SUTTON, W. VA. (U.P.) — Eyewitness accounts of a tall, glowing monster with a blood red face skulking in the hills divided Braxton County today into two camps — believers and skeptics. Seven persons said they saw the unearthly being, described as ‘worse than Frankenstein,’ in the hills above Flatwood Friday night. State police and a number of residents hooted at the reports as a product of mass hysteria. Police said the eyewitnesses’ guess as to the monster’s height varied from seven to 17 feet. The excitement began when the two young sons of Mrs. Kathryn May, a Flatwood beautician, said they saw a ‘flying saucer’ land on C.B. Fisher’s farm near here. Mrs. May, Gene Lemon, a National Guardsman, and five boys climbed a hill on the farm to look for the ‘saucer.’ Mrs. May said a ‘fire-breathing monster, 10 feet tall with bright green body and a blood-red face,’ bounced and floated toward them. ‘It looked worse than Frankenstein,’ she said. ‘It couldn’t have been human.’”


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