Brooklyn Boro

August 13: ON THIS DAY in 1945, Peace jitters sweep world

August 13, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Westerner, a fast express leaving from Grand Central depot, promptly drew out of the station at 2 o’clock this afternoon, carrying a happy party of Grand Army men and their wives. The men are bound for Portland, Ore., where the fifty-second annual national encampment is to be held. Stops will be made to take on Grand Army members at Buffalo and Chicago. The party will arrive at Portland on Sunday morning. On the following Tuesday there will be a parade and the encampment program will opened on Wednesday.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “BOSTON — Other arrests are expected within 24 hours as the further result of the investigation of spectacular financing which began when Charles Ponzi’s Securities Exchange Company fell under suspicion. With the matter of Ponzi’s affairs pretty well in hand, Attorney General J. Weston Allen has turned his attention to other money-making enterprises which, it is claimed, have been conducted in violation of the law and to the loss of too credulous investors. Ponzi remained at his home in Lexington today, denying himself to interviewers. A score of men, supposed to be government agents and policemen, were in the vicinity of his residence apparently with a view to keeping watch on his movements.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “A war veterans’ hospital in Bay Ridge appeared assured today when a resolution approving its establishment was introduced at the American [Legion] state convention in the Hotel Pennsylvania. While the resolution is one of seven offered by the Kings County delegation, many other delegations indicated their support of the measure and no opposition was expected. Setting up the hospital requires congressional approval and all of the state’s representatives and both senators have declared themselves in its favor. The convention also had before it a resolution condemning the government practice of sending home and discharging wounded men in need of hospitalization. The resolution urged that the Veterans Bureau be required to provide necessary hospital service for the men of World War II.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “Eight of Luna Park’s 16 1/2 acres were reduced to a mass of twisted, smoking wreckage late yesterday by a spectacular fire, which, though resulting in an estimated total of $500,000 damage, was brought under control without causing a single fatality. Flames shooting skyward as high as 400 feet roared and crackled across eight of the amusement park’s 16 1/2 acres, while thousands of spectators jammed Surf Ave. Towers, rides and other recreation devices tumbled to the ground as the fire raged for two hours before being brought under control. But Coney Island, the playground of New York City’s millions, with an estimated 750,000 men, women and children packing the beaches at the time, averted panic. Late reports indicated the resort had come through one of its worst fires in recent years with no more than 16 persons receiving minor injuries.”

***

-->

ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “New Yorkers today awaited the news that peace again reigned in the world in a state of high expectancy but, at the same time, in a skeptical frame of mind. They had traveled the emotional roller coaster culminating in the high thrill and spill of a false United Press flash announcing the end of the war … The fires of celebration flared high shortly after 9:30 o’clock when the United Press unglued people’s ears from their radios and sent them cheering into the streets. In Brooklyn, Navy Yard whistles screeched as the streets filled rapidly … GIs and civilians in bars rushed into the streets with joy unconfined. Shipyards up and down the river joined in the tooting, auto horns melted into the din and tons of paper scraps were fluttering from windows when, at 9:36 p.m., the U.P. wired editors: ‘Hold that flash!’”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment