Brooklyn Boro

July 30: ON THIS DAY in 1914, Belgrade, Servian capital, bombarded by Austrians

July 30, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1846, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Esther Russell, widow of the late meritorious officer Phillip P. Russell, died at Philadelphia on Sunday, 88 years of age. She survived nine of thirteen children, and was the grand and great-grandmother of seventy children. She was a lady of the old style, distinguished for the great retainment of mind of the scenes in which her husband and herself passed through during the revolution, and particularly of the incidents of Philadelphia when in possession of the British troops under General Howe.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1849, the Eagle reported, “We see that our friend Norris, who went out to California in Feb. last, has established himself at Banicia and is engaged in coining the gold of California into quarter and half Eagles. His half Eagles bear the initials of the firm in New York to which he belongs: ‘Norris Greig and Norris.’ Mr. Norris is a brother of Rev. Mr. Norris of the Sands street Methodist church and went from this city.”

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News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

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ON THIS DAY IN 1868, the Eagle reported, “A weak-minded person in Germany has gone mad in consequence of the impeachment excitement. He thinks he is President [Andrew] Johnson, and has been convicted. He was sent to the lunatic asylum near Bonn.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1910, the Eagle reported, “Residents on Cornelia Street, between Knickerbocker and Irving Avenues, brought out their cots and slept on the street last night in an effort to prevent the New York Telephone Company from planting giant telephone poles there to continue a telephone line along that thoroughfare. From the minute the telephone men made their appearance, the householders established ‘watches’ and they all worked together in two shifts, until an injunction restraining the company had been obtained after a midnight campaign.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Eagle reported, “When the officials of the big European-American steamship companies were asked how they would return to America the 100,000 American tourists on the continent in the event of a general European war, their replies were evasive. They are seriously worried over the situation, but are unable to make plans or announcements while the issue of war and peace is still in the balance. Practically all the steamships owned by the Austrian, French, German, British and Italian lines are subsidized by their several governments, and in time of war could be taken over by the war departments for whatever use they might be needed. If they were not pressed into war service, they could not be used for the transportation of Americans to this country, because while sailing under the flag of a warring power they would face the risk of seizure. The one recourse open to an American abroad, should hostilities among all the important nations be declared, would lie in his ability to return to this country on either an American ship or one flying the colors of a non-partisan nation.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “Charles Ponzi, the new-style financier who claims to have amassed millions within a few months, and who has paid to the public large profits on their investments in his deal in international exchange, appeared today to have almost satisfied the question among his investors as to his solvency. Only a short line formed before the payment window of the Ponzi office this morning … Ponzi’s manager said she had seen nothing of any investigators as yet, although federal, state and county inquiries are under way.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “SEOUL (U.P.) — A sergeant in Company A of the 5th Regimental Combat Team, last American to die in the Korean War, was killed only 80 minutes before the cease fire, the 8th Army announced today. His name was withheld pending notification of next of kin. An 8th Army spokesman said mortar fire felled the sergeant at 8:40 p.m., July 27. All fighting ended at 10 p.m. Forty minutes before the sergeant died, at exactly 8 p.m., mortar fire killed another American — a private in Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 279th Infantry Regiment, 45th Division.”


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