Brooklyn Boro

July 10: ON THIS DAY in 1943, Hard fighting rages in Sicily

July 10, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1891, the Eagle reported, “At yesterday’s session of the convention of the association of teachers of the deaf and dumb at Crosbyside, a highly interesting account was given of the phenomenal results achieved in the case of Helen Keller, a child who is not only deaf and dumb, but also blind … Helen’s parents brought her to Dr. A. Graham Bell [who] suggested that Helen be taught to speak, but the parents did not receive the suggestion with favor, as the difficulties seemed too great. However, instruction was begun and a Miss Sullivan, who is possessed of a special genius for teaching deaf mutes, undertook the difficult task.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “ROME — Emperor William himself has fallen a victim to the influenza that has been so prevalent in the German army, according to advices from a Swiss source that have reached the Epoca. These declare that the Emperor has gone home from the French front because of the attack of ‘Spanish grip,’ as it is called, and that several members of the Emperor’s family are also suffering from the same malady.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1925, the Eagle reported, “DAYTON, TENN. (AP) — A new indictment, based upon the evidence responsible for the old document, was returned against John Thomas Scopes by the Rhea County Grand Jury here today. The indictment charged violation of the recently enacted Tennessee law prohibiting the teaching of evolution theories in the public schools … The opening of the court was marked by what was expected to be the first of many demonstrations when the entrance of William Jennings Bryan provoked a burst of handclapping from spectators packing the courtroom. As the leading member of the prosecution’s staff of attorneys walked within the bar of the court he was greeted cordially by Clarence Darrow and Dudley Field Malone, leaders in the defense group of lawyers.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1936, the Eagle reported, “The great experiment of frying an egg on the steps of Borough Hall was tried yesterday by an Eagle reporter … At 2:50 p.m., when New York’s all-time heat record was exploding, he arrived at Borough Hall, juggling one egg, one saltshaker and one pepper shaker … Momentarily he expected Borough President Raymond V. Ingersoll to dash out of his offices shouting: ‘You can’t do that on my doorstep.’ But he went ahead and cracked the egg … In no time everybody in Court Square gathered around offering advice, suggestions and bets … But 15 minutes later everyone agreed it was a fizzle … It was definitely not fried.”

***


ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, NORTH AFRICA (UP) — The United Nations opened the battle of Europe today by sending powerful invasion forces swarming onto the beaches of Sicily, and the first eyewitness report said a bombardment by Allied warships had ‘started a chain of smoke and flames’ stretching ten miles into the island. A mighty aerial umbrella aided the Allied invasion forces which were made up of American, British and Canadian troops. Meager and unofficial reports said the invasion, aided by heavy naval support, was ‘proceeding according to plan.’ Indications were that the Axis defenders were putting up a stiff fight.” It was also reported, “Brooklyn residents of Italian descent took news of the Allied invasion of Sicily calmly and stoically, their chief reaction summed up in the terse statement, ‘Let’s get it over with fast.’ Many, with relatives in both armies, expressed hope that Allied victory, uppermost in their thoughts, would be accomplished with as little bloodshed as possible.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO (U.P.) — Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower swept out in front of the Republican convention race today at the head of a stop-Taft coalition that seemed likely to hand him the G.O.P. presidential nomination. Eisenhower was riding the crest of a smashing victory in the ‘battle of the stolen delegates’ as the Republicans returned to the stockyard amphitheater for the fourth day of their 25th national convention. But Ohio’s Senator Robert A. Taft, who twice before has had the nomination snatched from him, was fighting back with everything at his command to smash the coalition opposing him.”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment