Brooklyn Boro

July 9: ON THIS DAY in 1947, Atom bomb secrets stolen from files

July 9, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1846, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial stated, “Under the rule (we suppose) that ‘Misery loves company,’ the N.Y. Express talks as though Brooklyn were a part of the great City of Wickedness on the opposite shore — talks of our dirt and pigs. We confess the pigs; but as to the dirt, we have hardly any at all except what comes from New York — brought on the heels of the thousands who so eagerly rush over on our ferries, out of that stifling place, to enjoy our delicious goodness here. Poor, miserable New Yorkers! We pity you again!”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “The influenza from Spain has seized the Huns in the trenches and the tanks are able to scatter them with little opposition. In Austria, another sort of fever is enervating the foe. The treaty imposed by the Kaiser on Austria forgot to mention the influenza. Paragraph 5 provided that German and Austrian troops should be brought in contact with each other for the purpose of ‘educating them to mutual esteem, love and appreciation.’ These ideals are not to be sneezed at. But Spain has dealt them a hard blow.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Eagle reported, “The Polo Ground field is expected to be jammed to its capacity of 53,602 customers, paying from 55 cents to $2.20 to witness tomorrow’s all-star baseball spectacle. The game is scheduled to start at 12:30 p.m. (Eastern Standard time) and will be broadcast over NBC and CBS networks. How will Carl Hubbell, ace southpaw of the world champion Giants, fare against a batting order topped by Charlie Gehringer, Heinie Manush, Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, with Frank Higgins, Al Simmons, Joe Cronin and Bill Dickey bringing up the rear guard of sluggers?” Hubbell did just fine. He pitched three scoreless innings and set a record by striking out five future Hall of Famers in a row: Ruth, Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Simmons and Cronin.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1939, the Eagle reported, “WIMBLEDON, ENGLAND (AP) — Playing one of the greatest games of her life, Alice Marble of San Francisco today beat Kay Stammers of England, 6-2, 6-0, and in 25 minutes added the Wimbledon ‘world tennis championship’ to her United States crown. Alice gave the pretty English southpaw only 11 points in the second set, and from the very outset was so completely in command of the game that she never really was in danger. Queen Mother Mary and United States Ambassador Joseph P. Kennedy and Mrs. Kennedy presided over the center court from the royal box … Her triumph gave the United States a sweep of the singles titles, Bobby Riggs having won the men’s championship yesterday, with a chance to win all three doubles finals. Queen Mary asked that Miss Marble and Miss Stammers be presented to her in the royal box. She congratulated Alice on her victory.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Two members of the House-Senate Atomic Energy Committee said today that some secret atomic data had been stolen or lost from government files. But both the White House and the Atomic Committee’s chairman said that no such thefts had been reported to them. One committee member said some atomic documents had been stolen and that part of them had been recovered. Another referred to ‘missing data.’ Both asked not to be quoted by name. Their remarks were evoked by a New York Sun dispatch which said ‘unknown agents working from within the atomic energy plant at Oak Ridge, Tenn., have stolen several files of highly secret data on the atomic bomb.’ White House Press Secretary Charles G. Ross told questioners that ‘the White House, from President Truman on down, knows nothing about it.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — An official announcement of the engagement of Princess Elizabeth and Lt. Philip Mountbatten, former Prince Philip of Greece, was in preparation by Buckingham Palace today for imminent publication … A short engagement to be followed by a wedding in October was expected in court circles. Both Philip and Elizabeth were at the palace as the announcement was being prepared.”


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