Brooklyn Boro

June 30: ON THIS DAY in 1950, M’Arthur orders planes to bomb No. Korea bases

June 30, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1921, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Although official information is withheld, some of President Harding’s closest advisers expect him to nominate former President Taft for Chief Justice of the United States in the very near future. In some quarters it is believed that official announcement of the selection of Mr. Taft might be made today. There are many considerations entering into the choice, however, and among other officials high in the Administration, the belief prevailed that no nomination would go in until after the Fourth of July recess of Congress. All recent indications have pointed to the former President as Mr. Harding’s probable choice, but no nomination had been signed by the President early today.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN (AP) — A general housecleaning of militant Nazi forces, with Chancellor Adolf Hitler wielding the broom like a bludgeon, appeared to be in progress. A reliable source said Karl Ernst, commander of the Nazi Storm Troops in Berlin and Brandenburg, had been arrested together with many other Storm Troops extremists. Capt. Ernst Roehm, national commander of the Storm Troops and one of the most radical leaders, was rumored deposed from his post, but the rumor was not immediately confirmed. The streets of Berlin were patrolled by police armed with rifles and equipped with steel helmets. Hitler’s inner circle of guards — his Blackshirted Schutz Staffel — appeared in force, apparently supervising operations at Brownshirt headquarters and sub-headquarters. Premier Hermann Wilhelm Goering of Prussia was seen to enter secret police headquarters with his galaxy of adjutants. German authorities refused to state immediately what was happening in Berlin.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO (U.P.) — Ruth Steinhagen, 19, was held for the grand jury under $50,000 bond today for her attempt to kill baseball star Eddie Waitkus and was expected to be confined in a mental institution by nightfall. Felony Court Judge Matthew Hartigan set the bond after Waitkus, Philadelphia Phillies first baseman, testified she shot him near the heart June 14 after luring him to her hotel room with a note saying she had something important to discuss. A report submitted by Dr. William Haines, court psychiatrist, said the girl suffers from schizophrenia, or split personality, and is an ‘immature individual.’ Her attorneys, George Bieber and Michael Brodkin, said they had a petition ready to submit as soon as she was indicted today which states the girl ‘is unable to cooperate and unable to understand the charges against her.’ Waitkus, who was brought into court in a wheelchair, described in brief testimony how he returned to the Edgewater Beach Hotel the night of June 14 and found the note from Miss Steinhagen waiting for him. Miss Steinhagen, who has said she has been infatuated with Waitkus since she first saw him, listened quietly to his testimony. Mental doctors believe she wanted to kill Waitkus because she couldn’t have him.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “TOKYO (U.P.) — South Korean infantry pushed their way back into the East and West outskirts of Seoul today, the South Korean Mission reported, and General Douglas MacArthur ordered U.S. planes for the first time to attack Communist bases in North Korea. The North Korean Government radio said 27 American planes — identified by a later Moscow broadcast as B-29s — bombed the Northern capital of Pyongyang last night. If so, the American planes probably struck at air bases on the edge of the capital. The Korean Mission in Tokyo said the American-supported Southern army at last reports had driven within 2 1/2 miles on either side of the center of Seoul, the former South Korean capital. North Korean tanks were leaving the city by the east gate, it said. However, the Mission said it did not know whether the Southern forces actually had crossed the Han River, which curves in a semi-circle around the Southern edge of the city. The Mission said its information was received by telephone from the South Korean Government at the provisional capital of Taejon, where the government had fled just before the Northern invaders captured Seoul Wednesday.”


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