Brooklyn Boro

June 25: ON THIS DAY in 1948, U.S. flies aid to blockaded berlin

June 26, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “SAN FRANCISCO (U.P.) — A world still at war today placed its hope for a peaceful future in the charter of a new world organization unanimously adopted by the United Nations Conference. The representatives of the 50 nations approved the charter at 10:50 o’clock last night. They will sign the historic document today in a specially built, flag-draped, Hollywood-like setting in San Francisco’s stately Veterans Building. Tonight they will listen to President Truman give the charter his blessing and his promise to seek immediate United States ratification. The president’s address will conclude this nine-week conference. To China, which has been fighting aggression longer than any of the other United Nations, will go the honor of being first to sign the new charter. The United States, the host nation at the conference, will be last.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Bernard M. Baruch accused Russia today of waging a ‘cold war’ against the United States to stir up national unrest, but he said armed conflict between the two nations was not an immediate threat. The 76-year-old adviser to U.S. presidents outlined a 16-point program for industrial and military preparedness designed to foster peace throughout the world. High on his list of recommendations was universal military training. Mr. Baruch told the Industrial College of the Armed Forces that ‘there has been a lack of cooperation on the part of those whose friendship we solicit.’ ‘Perhaps they expect our economic collapse,’ he said. ‘If so, they will be disappointed. We shall continue after their experiment has failed. We dedicate ourselves to the individual. The others elevate the State into a godhead. But in the cold war that is being waged against us, we must always remember that their objective is our unrest. We can guard against that by a firm belief in ourselves, under the magnificent flowering of our century and a half of national life.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN (U.P.) — American planes began flying milk and medical supplies into Berlin today to ease the plight of 2,500,000 Germans victimized by a Russian attempt to drive the western allies out of the city. Communist-controlled trade unions here threatened a general strike. A feature of the Soviet campaign was the stirring up of unrest among the Germans. The Berlin City Council was reported to be planning to appeal to the United Nations to intervene in the four-power dispute on the off chance that such a move might bring some relief for the Germans caught in the squeeze. The council previously had directed the distribution of food for all zones in Berlin. Yesterday the Russians ordered it to halt all movement of food from the Soviet zone into the western sectors. The decision to appeal to the U.N. was said to have been made at a closed meeting of City Councillors late yesterday. A final draft was expected to be drawn up Monday and submitted to American or British authorities with a request that it be forwarded. Two trainloads of potatoes which crossed the zonal border before surface transport was halted a week ago reached Berlin, and a third was reported on the way. But it was a mere drop in the bucket.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “SEOUL (U.P.) — Tank-led North Korean Communist armies drove to within four miles of this capital city of South Korea early today and reports from the front said Republican defense forces were able to put up ‘almost no resistance.’ … The U.S. Army in Japan canceled some of its flights to Seoul today because of the ‘deteriorating situation’ there. The cancellation suggested the Kimpo Air Field outside Seoul might have fallen to the Communists … The South Korean Cabinet went into emergency session amid rumors that the capital may be moved — possibly to Kwongju in the southwestern part of the U.S.-sponsored republic. … The breakthrough was at Uijongbu, 17 miles north of Seoul, about 5:20 p.m., with an undetermined number of tanks spearheading the advance of the Communist striking force. South Korean soldiers, armed only with rifles and light machine-guns, were unable to stop the lumbering armored vehicles.”


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