Brooklyn Boro

June 23: ON THIS DAY in 1944, Last ditch battle raging for the port of Cherbourg

June 23, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1864, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The concurrent rumors from the army yesterday, that important movements were under way, are this morning officially confirmed by Secretary Stanton’s dispatch, which says that ‘movements are in progress which are now proper for publication.’ From the unexpected strength of the enemy’s position at Petersburg, we are prepared to hear that operations against that city are for the present abandoned. Two courses seem open to Gen. Grant. It is now known that Ewell’s corps has been sent to operate against Gen. Hunter. Lee’s army has been weakened to this extent. By crossing the Appomattox river with his whole army, Grant may be able to obtain possession of and hold the Richmond and Petersburg railroad, and in case he is strong enough to defeat Lee, break the Danville and Richmond railroad at a point east of the Appomattox. To save this line —  the only unbroken line connecting Richmond with the South — Lee will be compelled to give battle, and possibly Grant may be able to force a fight upon equal terms. Up to this time the enemy in every engagement have fought from behind entrenched positions.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1931, the Eagle reported, “X-ray pictures revealed today that two vertebrae of Ruth Nichols’ spine were cracked when her plane crashed yesterday at St. John, N.B., on the first leg of a transatlantic flight. Her doctor reported by telephone, however, that while the injury was painful it was in no way serious, as the cracked vertebrae were not dislocated and would mend easily and quickly. The doctor said that as soon as the extreme soreness incident to the spinal injury wore off, Miss Nichols would be tightly bandaged and would then leave at once for home, the Associated Press reports. The X-ray examination showed that Miss Nichols had suffered no internal injury. Entire blame for the crash of the plane was placed on conditions existing there at the time of landing in a telegram today from Clarence D. Chamberlin, her adviser on the projected Atlantic flight.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN (AP) — France made a final surrender to victorious Germany tonight, signing in the Forest of Compiegne a peace based upon the broad dictate laid down by Adolf Hitler. It was an armistice conditioned, however, on a second capitulation — to Italy — and tonight men fought on in a conflict that was a war no longer. It was an agreement that will bring a real armistice only after the French have made their terms with Premier Mussolini. Six hours after the notice of this second armistice has been received by the Nazi high command, the guns will cease to speak. In the same old railway car in the Compiegne Forest where the Kaiser’s delegation bowed in defeat to Marshal Ferdinand Foch on Nov. 11, 1918, two ranking generals at 6:50 p.m. put pens to the French surrender of 1940. The weary French delegation took a plane almost immediately for an undisclosed city in Italy to  begin their conversations with Mussolini. This French surrender at an old and bitterly remembered scene of German defeat — the railway car in the forest — was signed by Col. Gen. Wilhelm Keitel for Germany and by Gen. Charles Huntziger for France.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “ALLIED SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, LONDON (U.P.) — American shock troops battled their way closer to the Cherbourg Harbor and heart of the city today in the most violent fighting of the Normandy campaign, and victory appeared near, with some possibility that the port might already be in Allied hands. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s headquarters, hopeful that Cherbourg would fall at any time, revealed that the Americans had captured one of three main terrain features dominating the port as long ago as last midnight. Field dispatches from the outskirts of Cherbourg filed as the final assault on the city roared through its second day said the United States units had hacked their way forward at bayonet point more than a mile into the German fortifications blockading the southern gates of the city. Other ‘big bangs’ are being prepared coincident with the final drive to capture Cherbourg, it was revealed at headquarters, but where and when these will fall is known only to the Supreme Allied Command.”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment