Brooklyn Boro

June 22: ON THIS DAY in 1943, Troops halt Detroit riots; war plants slowed, 25 die

June 22, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1931, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Ruth Nichols, who is to attempt an ocean flight to Paris, arrived at Floyd Bennett Field on Barren Island at 1:30 p.m. today and announced that she would fly for St. John, N.B., this afternoon. Miss Nichols said that she had received information that the prospect for good flying weather off Newfoundland after tomorrow is fairly good. So, Miss Nichols said, she decided to go to St. John tonight and wait there until the present fog between St. John and Harbor Grace had cleared in the morning. Then she will go on to Harbor Grace and at the first favorable break in the weather will fly for Paris. Miss Nichols brought her luggage to the field here with her and stowed it into her Lockheed Vega plane. The plane was fueled with 250 gallons of gas and 25 gallons of oil, more than enough to enable her to reach St. John.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Administration tonight prepared to exercise wartime control over the movements of aliens in the United States as relations with the Axis progressively worsened. Only the thin thread of restricted diplomatic representation remained between Washington, Berlin and Rome after a week of intense international activity. The United States got in the final thrusts today — one aimed at Italy and the other at Germany. Under-Secretary of State Sumner Welles handed Don Ascanio Dei Principi Colonna, the Italian ambassador, a note requesting the closing of all Italian consulates in the United States by July 15 and the expulsion of all persons of Italian nationality connected with these offices. Welles also announced that he had transmitted to Hans Thomsen, the German charge d’affaires, a note calling Germany’s attention to President Roosevelt’s message to Congress on the sinking of the Robin Moor. This Government’s new control measures over aliens were designed to prevent sabotage and espionage and have legal basis in a new act Mr. Roosevelt signed the first thing this morning. The measure authorizes him to exercise the drastic alien control that President Wilson had during the first World War. It permits him to control the entry and departure from this country of all aliens and citizens.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “DETROIT (U.P.) — Motorized army troops restored law and order in Detroit today after violent race riots, but production slumped in war plants because of an excessive rate of absenteeism among Negro workers. Federal army detachments in battle uniforms bivouacked along a two-mile stretch of Woodward Ave., the city’s main thoroughfare, and mobile units — light tanks, jeeps and armored cars — rolled through narrower streets of the Negro section with guns loaded and orders to ‘use them — if necessary.’ The troops moved into the city shortly before midnight under direct orders from President Roosevelt to halt rioting Negro and white mobsters whose 24-hour reign of terror left 25 persons dead, nearly 700 injured and thousands of dollars of property damage. Tension seemed to vanish with arrival of the soldiers. Gov. Harry F. Kelly said reports from state and city police and federal authorities were ‘very good’ this morning. Last violence, he said, was reported at 4:30 a.m., when a Negro was killed while looting a store.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “A Brooklyn girl will be allowed to choose between two high schools offering Russian language courses, Dr. Calvin Gross, superintendent of schools, announced Friday. This is the first major change in ‘administrative policy … to put new vigor in the integration policy,’ he said, and also the school system’s partial answer to a sit-in by Brooklyn Chapter, Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) at the State Commission for Human Rights office. The superintendent left unanswered ‘pending further study’ a request of a second Negro student to transfer from John Jay High School to Erasmus Hall, also a cause for the CORE demonstration at the state office building, 270 Broadway, Manhattan. A Brooklyn CORE spokesman announced the sit-in would continue until action is announced on the second Negro student.”


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