Brooklyn Boro

May 22: ON THIS DAY in 1927, Lindberg at Paris in 33.5 hours

May 22, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1927, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “DETROIT (AP) — ‘That’s all that matters.’ In these words, Mrs. Evangeline Lodge Lindbergh, mother of Capt. Charles Lindbergh, expressed her relief when informed that her intrepid son had arrived safely at Le Bourget flying field, Paris, after an epochal flight from New York. Mrs. Lindbergh, who had been waiting silently since the hop-off from New York yesterday morning for the word of her son’s safe arrival, allowed herself a few tears of joy and then said: ‘I am deeply thankful for his safety and appreciative of the true sympathy expressed by so many people.’ Asked whether she had been confident of his success, she countered with: ‘How could anyone be confident?’ Then she added, ‘I knew if it were possible for any pilot, given a good machine, to make the flight, that he would.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1932, the Eagle reported, “CULMORE, ULSTER, NORTH IRELAND (AP) — Amelia Earhart Putnam, the first woman to fly the Atlantic alone, landed this afternoon in a field in this green countryside. She finished a hazardous flight in which she conquered fog and storm and the even more dangerous menace of fire. Four hours after she put out yesterday afternoon from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, she saw flames spitting from her exhaust. But she didn’t turn back. ‘I thought it safer to go ahead,’ she said. Tonight she slept in the farmhouse of Robert Gallagher, owner of the field in which she landed. Tomorrow she will go on to Croydon, England, in a borrowed airplane, leaving her own red and gold monoplane to be crated up and shipped back home … Flying on the fifth anniversary of the successful conclusion of Col. Charles A. Lindbergh’s New York-Paris hop, she put her name just under his on the roll of transatlantic honors, for Colonel Lindbergh is the only other person in the world who has made a solo transatlantic flight.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “CASABLANCA (Via Radio) — The first two Brooklyn soldiers to start home from Europe for demobilization and discharge, arriving here by converted Flying Fortress from Italy today, said, in almost identical language: ‘It all doesn’t seem real. I don’t believe it’s true.’ The Brooklyn GIs — Corp. Bartholomew Guida of 1955 62nd St. and Pfc. George Karp of 1924 82nd St. — were among 80 men of the 5th Army in the first consignment to be sent home for honorable discharge in the most expansive luxury of the Air Transport Command. This trickle will increase to a flood of 20,000 men a month after August. The boys came here from Pisa in seven B17s in which bomb bays were made into luggage racks and armament was replaced with cushioned seats. After a brief stay here they will continue on to the United States in the most modern C-54 E transports, the last word in flying luxury.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Administration today abandoned, at least for this year, President [Dwight] Eisenhower’s proposal to let 18-year-olds vote after the measure received a crushing Senate defeat. Only 34 senators lined up for the proposed Constitutional amendment yesterday against 24 opposed — far short of the necessary two-thirds vote. State rights-minded Southerners voted heavily against the measure. New York’s senators, Herbert H. Lehman (D.) and Irving H. Ives (R.) voted for the measure. Senate Republican Leader William F. Knowland said he did not plan an effort to get the vote reconsidered and knew of no plans by other members. Knowland said he did not think the result would be changed by absentees from yesterday’s vote. A solid bloc of 24 Democrats, led by Senator Richard B. Russell (D., Ga.), defeated the proposal. It was supported by 27 Republicans and only seven Democrats.”


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