Brooklyn Boro

May 18: ON THIS DAY in 1945, Heroes bring Jap-crippled carrier home

May 18, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “An order for 1,020,000 packages of chewing gum for the soldiers in the trenches has been placed with the foreign office of a big American chewing gum firm with international connections. It has been found that the gum is indispensable for the soldiers in steadying their nerves, and its use has been recommended by physicians. Because of its use in warfare, the chewing gum manufacturers feel that the proposed tax of 2 1/2 cents on each box of dollar chewing gum is a grave injustice, inasmuch as expensive candy, the luxury of the well-to-do, is not to be taxed under the proposal. The manufacturers are arguing for the repeal of the tax and pointing out the injustice of the proposed measure.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “Left for dead by the enemy 53 miles off the Jap coast, her hull racked by ammunition blasts and enveloped in flame, the aircraft carrier Franklin was home in the Brooklyn Navy Yard today after an epic 13,400-mile voyage with a skeleton crew of survivors. She started her journey back March 21, just two days after a Jap dive bomber, in one of those chances that her skipper, Capt. Leslie E. Gehres, frankly called ‘an aviator’s dream,’ caught her as she was about to launch her planes and landed two 500-pound bombs on her flight and hangar decks. A little more than a month later — April 26 — the Franklin sighted the Statue of Liberty, her main mast leaning at a sharp angle, her foremast a torn slump, her steel plates ragged and her flight deck gone. With a greater number of men lost and damaged worse than any other ship that ever entered New York harbor under her own power, she had joined the long distinguished roster of the navy’s ‘hero ships.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “The black market in meat can be smashed in two weeks with complete cooperation of wholesalers, retailers and consumers, Burton B. Turkus, counsel to the recently organized Greater New York Meat Dealers Protective Association, stated today. Response to appeals on the part of the association to refuse to deal at over ceiling prices had been ‘terrific,’ Mr. Turkus said. One wholesale group has already voted to shut down next Wednesday, and Mr. Turkus reported that the entire wholesale industry has scheduled a meeting today in the Hotel Roosevelt to consider following suit. Retailers are flocking to support the association, Mr. Turkus declared, adding that he expects to have 2,500 members enrolled by next Tuesday’s meeting in the Academy of Music. Consumers and housewives, too, have rallied to back the association with a flood of letters and telegrams, the attorney reported. ‘If wholesalers, retailers and shoppers all refuse to deal illicitly, we will definitely get someplace and drive the black market to its knees,’ was the prediction.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Stanley J. Harte, the sponsor of the proposed Bay Ridge project, announced yesterday that substantial progress has been made in finalizing of plans for developing the air rights over the Long Island Rail Road tracks between Second and Fourth Aves. in Bay Ridge. The government property adjoining the Long Island Rail Road property has been released by the Army to the General Services Administration for disposition. The General Services Administration is now in the process of having the land appraised and released for sale by all other branches of government … The present plans contemplate the construction of two twenty-eight story buildings, each of which will contain 390 residential apartments, one superintendent’s apartment and two professional apartments. A detailed rendering has been prepared which will be on display in the offices also of the Bay Ridge Home Reporter and Sunset News and The Brooklyn Spectator, where it will be available for inspection by all interested persons, whose criticisms will be welcomed and given careful consideration.”


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