Brooklyn Boro

May 15: ON THIS DAY in 1937, F.D. Risks defeat, spurs court showdown

May 15, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — President Roosevelt forced a controversial program before Congress today and moved to hammer his judiciary reorganization bill to a showdown vote. There were Democratic protests that Mr. Roosevelt’s court tactics would split the party permanently. Consensus of observers here is that the court bill is headed for compromise and the president for defeat if he forces the issue, but the decision may be a close one. Returning yesterday from his fishing trip, Mr. Roosevelt met his Congressional leaders and revealed his legislative plans. There was no mention of action this year to legislate for business some compensation for the advantages gained by labor under the collective bargaining guarantee of the Wagner Act. Congressional leaders said Mr. Roosevelt would: 1. Require the Senate to vote on his bill to expand the Supreme Court from nine to 15 members; 2. Compel Congress to decide for itself how to effect a 10 to 15 percent saving in next year’s budget; 3. Send a special message to Congress next week proposing the establishment of additional Federal power authorities patterned after TVA; 4. Perhaps ask Congress to enact minimum wage and maximum hours legislation at this session.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1939, the Eagle reported, “Quebec, May 15 (U.P.) — King George and Queen Elizabeth, surfeited with fog and ice, got their first glimpse of the New World today. The liner Empress of Australia, carrying the British monarchs on their first voyage to America, came in sight of the southern tip of Newfoundland at 7:30 a.m. Shortly thereafter, according to radio messages from the vessel, the ship passed within 18 miles of St. Pierre and Miquelon Islands, whose snow-covered hills glistened in the sunlight. Delayed two days, first by fog and then by icebergs which floated dangerously close, the liner finally found perfect sailing weather as it made the first landfall of the voyage.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “OSLO, NORWAY (U.P.) — Vidkun Quisling, the world’s most famous traitor, is cleaning the toilets of Oslo’s biggest prison, the United Press learned exclusively today. My informant, one of only six men who have seen the arch-traitor since he surrendered six days ago, said Quisling has been given the most menial tasks at the prison at Moellergarten 19. Nevertheless Quisling, 58 and fat, insists he is still the legal head of the Norwegian government. He complains constantly about his prison treatment. Two tough guards with tommy-guns stand over the puppet premier while he goes to work with a brush and a bucket of water.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, Eagle sports columnist Steve Solomon wrote, “Mama Throneberry just didn’t pick the name ‘Marvin Eugene’ out of a hat when she gave identity to her bouncing baby boy back on September 2, 1933 in the town of Collierville, Tennessee. Something inside of her told her that the baby with the round full face and the long legs had to have the initials M.E.T. Possibly she didn’t realize why, but 29 years later the answer was clear as the mud on her son’s uniform. If Albert Einstein was born with the brain of a mathematical genius; if Babe Ruth was born to be the king of swat, then Marvin Eugene Throneberry was born to be a Met. Why are men set aside, given certain unquestionable abilities and then sent on [their] way to fulfill their life’s purposes? Who can say? But it was in the cards that Marvelous Marv would become the living legend of a ballclub who would bring the National League back to New York.”

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ON MAY 17, 1939, the Eagle reported, “PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The American League’s first game in a nocturnal setting went down in baseball history today as a brilliant innovation and another game in the win column for the Cleveland Indians. Although the 15,000 fans who braved the chill of Shibe Park last night to witness the inaugural fell short of expectations, the occasion was hailed as a pronounced success. The fanfare of bands and sundry ceremonies preluded a 10-inning battle. The Athletics had the Indians on even terms going into the tenth, but in the extra session the visitors pounded out five runs to make the final count 8 to 3.”


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