Brooklyn Boro

May 11: ON THIS DAY in 1949, Berlin train beats deadline

May 11, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — A clash between the royal family and the government has broken out behind the scenes at the height of the coronation festivities over the wedding of Mrs. Wallis Warfield Simpson and the Duke of Windsor … The royal family wishes to be officially represented at the wedding but the government has advised against any member being present, officially or otherwise. As soon as Mrs. Warfield’s divorce became final, it was understood, the royal family as a whole decided to be represented at the marriage and the Duke and Duchess of Kent were designated. But the government was dismayed at the glare of publicity given in England to Mrs. Warfield’s decree absolute and the reunion at the Chateau de Cande, despite the fact that the press received official hints to play down the romance during the coronation. The government’s position against British royalty being present at the wedding would be tantamount to forbidding it, but the situation now is deadlocked.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “MITTENDORF, AUSTRIA (U.P.) — The commander of Heinrich Himmler’s SS guard surrendered to us today but the hangman himself fled while we laid new plans to catch him. Himmler arrived at this Alpine town by plane on Tuesday, according to accounts here, but he was gone when we arrived. While we hatched a plot for following him into a new mountain hideaway, his SS commander, Karl Rieger, came in to surrender and to say that Himmler was not on the hill. ‘It looks like your bird has flown,’ said Wehrmacht Doctor Karl Wahlster, a former Viennese specialist who was helping us. The first clue to Himmler’s whereabouts came from a Mittendorf resident, Albert Sickmann, who was brought to the 3rd Division command post last night to tell of the Gestapo chief’s arrival on Tuesday. Sickmann said he was employed at Himmler’s hideout but fled after he was beaten by SS troopers for damaging a vehicle. Sickmann said the hideout was 45 miles east of Salzburg and that there were 175 SS troops there.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN (U.P.) — The Berlin blockade, Russia’s supreme and futile maneuver in the cold war, crumbled away today as a land rush of Western traffic raced toward the city and the Soviets razed their barriers here. U.S. authorities sent their first train speeding for Berlin, and 16 others were waiting with steam up for the formal windup of the blockade at one minute after midnight (6:01 p.m. Brooklyn time). Hundreds of vehicles — automobiles, trucks, bicycles, horse-carts, wheelbarrows — massed along the highways and surged toward the zonal border. Berlin itself prepared for a historic celebration to mark its liberation from the 11 months of Soviet traffic shackles. The Russians blasted 60 traffic barriers along the Soviet sector border inside Berlin — iron and concrete monuments to the all-out effort short of war to oust the Western Powers from the former capital. Soviet sector police said Russian and German guards at the checkpoints between East and West sectors of Berlin would be removed at zero hour.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “The New York Mets, who brought National League baseball back to the metropolitan area, will bring the metropolitan area back to baseball in their second annual Oldtimers’ Day at the Polo Grounds on Saturday afternoon, June 22. Aware of the fact that this area produced many outstanding major leaguers, President George M. Weiss plans inviting the native sons, so to speak, back to the Polo Grounds on June 22. The teams participating in the Oldtimers’ Day game will be divided into American and National League teams. A regular game between the Mets and Phillies will follow. The metropolitan area, for the purposes of the game, will be considered to lie within a 90-mile radius of the city. The sidewalks of New York have produced many outstanding stars, including two Hall of Famers, Frank Frisch and Hank Greenberg. Frisch came right from the Fordham campus to star with the New York Giants and later managed the famous St. Louis Cardinals “Gas House Gang.” Greenberg graduated from James Monroe High in the Bronx, the same school which sent the 18-year-old Ed Kranepool to the Mets.”


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