Brooklyn Boro

May 6: ON THIS DAY in 1917, Get at Germany’s throat and end war

May 6, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Great Britain formally joined France today in expressing the hope that an American expeditionary force soon would take its place on the western front in Europe. While no formal announcement was made, the impression grew after the meeting that an American Army will go to the western front as soon as possible. Foreign Secretary Balfour told the Council of National Defense that the British would be overjoyed to welcome an American force in France, and that its early dispatch could not but have an enormous psychological effect both on the Allies and on their enemies. Today’s meeting brought together for the first time for formal conference the British and American military officials, and there was a preliminary study of the whole general situation under the five heads of intelligence work, munitions, materials, hospitals and the expeditionary force question. Five joint committees were appointed to work out a series of recommendations on these subjects.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1925, the Eagle reported, “The will of Charles H. Ebbets, late president of the Brooklyn National League Baseball Club, which was filed today in the office of the Surrogate after considerable delay, divides his estate among his relatives. The document was filed by Gray & Tomlin of 32 Court St., attorneys for the executors. They did not draw the testament, which is rather difficult of interpretation in some of its provisions. There has been considerable delay preceding the formal filing of the document … No estimate of the value of the estate is given, but it is generally believed to be worth more than $1,000,000, a large part of which represents the testator’s share in the Brooklyn Baseball Club. The late Edward J. McKeever and his brother, Steven McKeever, had a half interest in the club. The fate of the club is left to the judgment of the executors.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “New Yorkers today awaited the German dirigible Hindenburg, which is due to dock at Lakehurst, N.J. at 6 p.m. It was due to arrive over the city at 3 o’clock. Delayed by headwinds off the Newfoundland coast, the giant airship was 12 hours behind schedule. She originally was due to fly over the city at dawn today. Capt. Max Pruss indicated he would fly the ship above Manhattan briefly and then head for Lakehurst.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “The Gowanus Elevated Parkway along Hamilton Ave. from Prospect Ave. to Hicks St., a link of the Belt Parkway, was opened for traffic today, extending the circumferential roadway to the proposed entrance to the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel at Hicks St. According to the Triborough Bridge Authority, the tunnel will not be completed until after the war, but the $15,000,000 Gowanus improvement is being made accessible by the widening of Hicks St. to Atlantic Ave. The highway runs over the Gowanus Canal, providing a 90-foot clearance. There are three lanes in each direction, divided by a center mall. Traffic is limited to passenger cars.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “MOSCOW (UPI) — The Russians have broken 18 years of silence and admitted they recovered Adolf Hitler’s burned body when they smashed into Berlin at the end of World War II, it was disclosed yesterday. Up to now the official Soviet position has been that Hitler may have escaped to Spain or Argentina. The Soviet admission was made by Marshall Vasili Sokolovsky to Cornelius Ryan, American author of ‘The Longest Day,’ who has completed a two-week study of top secret archives of the Red army’s final assault on Berlin. Ryan told United Press International he had obtained from the Russians the fullest version of what happened in Hitler’s bunker the last few days of the war, an account which differs substantially from the one accepted in the West. Sokolovsky was Marshal Georgi Zhukov’s chief of operations during the Battle of Berlin and until recently was chief of staff of the Soviet armed forces.”


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