Brooklyn Boro

March 24: ON THIS DAY in 1943, Nazis close up Mareth gap

March 24, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1900, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Many a spadeful of earth has been upturned on Manhattan Island, but never was an upturning attended by so much significance as that performed with a silver spade in front of the City Hall this afternoon. For years New Yorkers, official and unofficial, rich and poor, have thought and talked about rapid transit, the ever growing problem of the metropolis. During the past twelve months, in municipal circles, there has been no topic to rival it in public importance, and today Mayor Van Wyck, in the presence of the Rapid Transit Commission and the invited guests of the city, made the work a reality and not a scheme. Millions of dollars will have to be spent before New York can be equipped with a transit system such as the commissioners have planned. To complete the project in its entirety will take a long time, but a start is everything, and this afternoon New York’s greatest public improvement had its formal beginning.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Office of Price Administration served notice on Americans today that they will do well to stop dreaming of steak and focus their appetites and point purchasing power on hamburger, stew and such delicacies as pigs’ ears, pork kidneys and beef brains. The OPA published the official list of points which housewives will have to fork over for meat, cheese, butter, fats, cooking oils and canned fish when rationing of those foods goes into effect next Monday. There are 16 points per person per week. Steak and butter each will be eight points per pound. So a pound of each would use up the entire 16 points. The points can be divided up among meats, fats and cheese any way a person desires. OPA officials predicted an average consumer might choose each week about two pounds of meat, three-fourths of a pound of butter and cooking fats, and two ounces of cheese, but thrifty housewives, in buying their weekly meat supplies, will be wise to consider the rib-sticking quality of what they purchase above its palate-tickling properties.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (UP) — Dowager Queen Mary, the grand old lady of the British Commonwealth, has suffered an internal hemorrhage and her heart action is weakening seriously, it was disclosed today. The physicians of the 85-year-old grandmother of Queen Elizabeth II fear she may not live through the day. The Archbishop of Canterbury, spiritual head of the Church of England, was summoned to her bedside after it became evident that her condition was desperate. Other members of the royal family, including the Duke of Windsor, her favorite son, and Princess Mary, the Princess Royal, her only daughter, gathered at her old brick mansion, Marlborough House. Queen Elizabeth, whom the old lady used to hold in her arms as an infant, awaited a call to the bedside from nearby Buckingham Palace, where she was working on state papers … It was understood that, in keeping with the standard that had made her beloved by all her people, she had expressed the wish in her will that if she died, the coronation of the young queen should be held as scheduled June 2.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Health authorities in the United States and Switzerland tried today to stem the spread of typhoid fever by isolating suspected victims and searching for more possible carriers of the sometimes fatal disease. Swiss medical officers prepared to move 35 suspected typhoid cases from a temporary hospital in the Alpine village of Zermatt to facilities in the valley below. This was the first step in eradicating an epidemic in the town which already has affected more than 100 persons. The moving operation should be over by tomorrow, when the task begins of testing blood samples from about 3,000 villagers and foreign workers in Zermatt. The New York City Health Department said one young woman was hospitalized at the Cornell University Medical Center with typhoid fever apparently contracted in Zermatt. A spokesman at New York Hospital, a part of the center, said the victim ‘is recuperating nicely.’”


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