Brooklyn Boro

March 18: ON THIS DAY in 1949, Pact would tie U.S., Europe against Reds for 20 years

March 18, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1847, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Notwithstanding the blustery state of the weather, the sons of St. Patrick, both in Brooklyn and over the river, celebrated his anniversary yesterday with becoming ardor. The processions of the various Irish benevolent societies were handsome, and the display of banners, emblems, etc., imposing. All of them have declined partaking of the usual annual dinner, but generously appropriated a sum equal to the cost of such a feast, to the relief of their suffering countrymen at home.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1905, the Eagle reported, “St. Patrick’s Day in New York City was more notable this year than ever before because the president of the United States came on from Washington and made a speech to the Friendly Sons at their annual banquet held at Delmonico’s last night. The president got one of the most cordial receptions ever given him in New York and he won the admiration of every Friendly Son when he offered a toast to Patrick McDonnell, a youngster two hours old, whose father sent the following telegram to Grandfather Peter McDonnell, one of the diners: ‘Peter McDonnell, Friendly Sons of St. Patrick. Patrick just arrived, tired after parade, Sends his regrets to President.’ … President Roosevelt, before he went into his speech proper, said: ‘Now, I want you to join me in drinking the health of Patrick McDonnell and Peter McDonnell and, above all, Mrs. McDonnell.’ There was a great cheer and the grandfather hid his blushing countenance behind a napkin.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “The eagerness of golfers the country over to take advantage of any scheme to assist the government in the successful prosecution of the war is shown by the taking up of the scheme for playing golf without caddies. It was only on November 22 last that the Eagle suggested that a large sum of money, not to speak of the freeing of boy labor, would be saved by doing away with caddies and playing the game sans caddies, as has been the rule for years with hundreds of players at Van Cortlandt Park, Pelham Bay and other municipal links. So strong an appeal did this make that on December 13 the New York Sun reproduced the Eagle article as presenting a very feasible plan for lowering the ‘high cost of golf.’ The idea was discussed elsewhere and on reaching the West was at once seriously considered by influential golfers. Already the golf clubs of the country had responded quickly to the request of the Fuel Administrator that they close their clubhouses during the cold weather to conserve coal, and it was quite to be expected that so practical a plan as doing away with caddies, involving as it did merely the personal comfort of players, would be received with favor.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — The North Atlantic Treaty would pledge the United States in general to help Western Europe repel any Russian attack for 20 years. But at a showdown, it would bind this country to take ‘only such action as it deems necessary, including the use of armed forces.’ This was disclosed today with the first official announcement of the exact text of the proposed treaty. The text was published here and in Western Europe capitals after months of negotiating on the basic points and weeks of final polishing of the language. It would be a 20-year ‘collective defensive’ alliance of the United States, Canada and Western Europe against Soviet Russia, although Russia is not mentioned by name. It would cover territory right up to the Iron Curtain, including the Allied zones of Berlin inside the Soviet zone of Germany. An armed attack against any pact member ‘shall be considered an attack against them all.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “TAMPA (UPI) — An overflow crowd of 8,359, largest in Tampa’s history, saw the Cincinnati Reds beat the New York Yankees, 6-3, yesterday. Wally Post and Gordy Coleman socked homers for the Reds, who combed Yankee hurlers Jackie McCullen, Al Downing and Bud Daley for 12 hits. Jim Maloney, Jim Brosnan and Bill Henry teamed up to stop the Yanks on eight hits. Rookie Pete Rose’s single, a balk, and Gene Freese’s single gave the Reds a run in the first inning.”


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