Brooklyn Boro

February 25: ON THIS DAY in 1942, Los Angeles barrage routs mystery raid

February 25, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1848, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The announcement of the death of Mr. [John Quincy] Adams in our paper yesterday has proved to be correct. This distinguished statesman, who has been so constantly before the people of the United States for the last sixty years, closed his career appropriately under the dome of the capitol, in the speaker’s room, on Wednesday evening the 23rd of February, at twenty minutes past seven o’clock. It will be remembered that he was seized with illness while attending to his duties in the House, on Monday, the 21st, and just after he had voted on an important question. He was carried into the speaker’s room, to which place medical aid was summoned, but he could not be removed to his own dwelling, and fell appropriately, like a distinguished Roman, in the Senate house. He was scarcely sensible after the attack. On one occasion, however, he opened his eyes and exclaimed, “This is the last of earth — I am composed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle reported, “The Most Rev. Raymond Augustine Kearney, youngest member of the hierarchy in the world, today was consecrated Auxiliary Bishop of Brooklyn and titular Bishop of Lysinia, in an ancient and impressive ritual that traces directly back to Apostolic days. The slight young monsignor was elevated to the bishopric by Bishop Thomas E. Molloy in the great granite church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, 5th Ave. and 59th St., before a notable gathering of churchmen and distinguished laymen. An archbishop and 14 bishops, resplendent in the brilliant robes of their office and tall gold mitres on their heads, 100 purple-robed monsignori, more than 1,000 secular priests, monks and brothers took part in the consecration ceremonies and the colorful pageant in the sun-flooded streets of Bay Ridge that preceded the actual services.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “Los Angeles (U.P.) — Long Beach police reported that unidentified planes flew over coastal Los Angeles County early today while anti-aircraft searchlights and guns were active and the coast was blacked out from Santa Monica to San Diego. The Long Beach police said they saw planes in the cone of army searchlight beams and that after penetrating a few miles inland from the ocean the plans veered to the south and disappeared. They said they saw either two separate flights or the same one twice. Inglewood police said they, too, saw unidentified planes in the searchlight beams as anti-aircraft guns fired over that Southwest Los Angeles suburb. Anti-aircraft batteries along the Pacific Ocean engaged in a sustained barrage, and the bursts of fire could be seen in downtown Los Angeles, approximately 15 miles away.

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “U.S. Pacific Fleet Headquarters, Guam (U.P.) —  Tank-led shock troops of three marine divisions, advancing as much as 600 yards in a general offensive, have swept to the heart of Iwo’s central airfield and captured approximately half of the embattled doorstep island to Japan, it was disclosed today. Driving forward on a 2 1/2-mile front extending across the center of the island under cover of a land, air and sea bombardment, the marines expanded their east coast beachhead about 600 yards, drove 300 to 500 yards through the center of the strong Japanese defense lines and expanded their grip on the east coast by several hundred yards.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Saigon (UPI) —  Two U.S. Army H21 helicopters were shot down Sunday by Communist ground fire and an American machine gunner aboard one of the craft was killed, a U.S. military spokesman reported. The spokesman said the incident occurred when three H21s were evacuating wounded Vietnamese soldiers from a mountainous battle zone about 100 miles north of Saigon. He said two of the helicopters were knocked down by enemy fire. The machine gunner, a private first class, was mortally wounded as bullets ripped through one of the craft, the spokesman said. One of the helicopters was repaired on the spot and evacuated the wounded youth to Saigon, where he died from loss of blood. His death brought to 52 the number of Americans killed in combat since the U.S. military buildup in south Vietnam began in 1961.”


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