Brooklyn Boro

January 10: ON THIS DAY in 1940, hero dog rescues pals marooned on Hudson River

January 10, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “After Police Marine Launch No. 3, the Coast Guard icebreaker Arundo and a Coast Guard plane from Floyd Bennett Field had failed to reach them, two dogs were rescued from an ice floe on which they were marooned in the Hudson River today by two policemen and two A.S.P.C.A. agents in rowboats.

The hero of the drama, a third dog, who had escaped to shore by his own efforts and gave the alarm by his frantic barking, disappeared during the rescue efforts. Police are searching for him in order that he may be cared for. The two trapped dogs, described as fox terriers, were wrapped in blankets and taken in the A.S.P.C.A. ambulance to the society’s shelter at E. 22nd St. and Avenue A, Manhattan, with a police radio car escort leading the way with siren open.

Shortly after 9:30 a.m., Patrolman Patrick Griffin of the W. 100th St. station, Manhattan, saw a small dog, dripping wet, running frantically up and down and barking at the foot of 125th St. The dog seemed to be trying to attract the officer’s attention to the ice floe about 200 yards offshore on which the dogs were marooned. Traffic on the Henry Hudson Parkway was slowed up by a crowd cheering the rescue.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Treaty of Versailles, making peace between Germany and the ratifying allied Powers, was put into effect at 4:15 o’clock by the exchange of ratifications. The proceedings began without any ceremony, Premier Lloyd George of Great Britain following the German delegates at the signature table. He was succeeded by Premier Clemenceau of France, who, on returning to his seat after signing, stopped in front of Baron von Lersner and Herr von Simon. The German representatives arose and bowed to Mr. Clemenceau, who said a few words which were inaudible to the spectators. The Premier then passed on to his place without shaking hands. The entire ceremony, which took place in the clock hall at the French Foreign Ministry, was completed by 4:16 o’clock. Although the exchange of ratifications of the Versailles Treaty is the final act that restores before-the-war relations between Germany and France, no arrangements have been made by Germany, so far as can be ascertained here, to resume peace relations with this country.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “Fred C. Trump, outstanding borough home builder, announced yesterday the sale of twenty-two homes in his latest development at Cropsey Ave. and 18th Ave., adjoining Bensonhurst City Park. The preview showing of these homes took place on Saturday, December 13, ‘only twelve days before Christmas and during the week of the Pearl Harbor attack and the three declarations of war,’ he said. ‘These twenty-two purchases, made under adverse conditions,’ Trump said, ‘are a tribute to the confidence of the American public in the future of our country. And these sales prove to me that neither holidays and winter, nor wartime conditions can stem the all-time record demand of recent month for new homes, that is until every available home is taken.’”

***


ON JAN. 11, 1963, the Eagle reported, “Washington — President Kennedy is smoking Cuban cigars despite his ban on their importation. Secretary Dean Rusk is the source of this intriguing bit of information. It was disclosed at a social gathering in the State Department during the recent holidays. Much to the surprise of newsmen, Rusk came early and stayed late. Usually he drops in briefly and hurries off. This time he had several drinks, and was most affable and chatty. Taking advantage of this exceptional opportunity, one reporter on the chance of getting a Cuban clue, asked, ‘Mr. Secretary, without revealing any policy secrets, can you tell us when we might get our Cuban cigars back?’ With a smile, Rusk replied, ‘If you’re really interested, I’ll tell you how you can obtain them.’ When the correspondent nodded eagerly, Rusk continued, ‘Go to one of your diplomatic friends whose country has a mission in Havana and ask him to get you a supply of these cigars.’ At this, another reporter chimed in. ‘But Mr. Secretary, that wouldn’t be patriotic.’ ‘Come, come now,’ chuckled Rusk. ‘Surely you’ve been around Washington long enough to have lost your virginity?’”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment