Brooklyn Boro

November 25: ON THIS DAY in 1905, bones of the ‘King of Beasts’ uncovered

November 25, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1905, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Out of the rocks in Northern Montana, scientists have dug the skeleton of the real King of Beasts. An expedition sent out by the American Museum of Natural History in New York has just reported the resurrection of the largest flesh-eating land animal thus far known to the world. This constitutes one of the most remarkable finds in the recent history of paleontology. The curator of the Department of Vertebrate Paleontology of this museum, Professor Henry F. Osborn, under whose direction the expedition was sent out, has conferred upon this newly discovered monster the title ‘Tyrannosaurus Rex.’ In plain English this means the ‘Tyrant King Saurian,’ or the King of Tyrant Saurians. The remains of this denizen of the past are being shipped to New York in a number of carefully made boxes, some of the boxes weighing over two tons. Every bone will be placed in its proper place in the skeleton, missing bones will be modeled out of plaster of paris, and in a few months the completed skeleton will be placed on exhibition in the halls of the museum, where visitors may come and see what this king of beasts a few million years ago was like … Mr. Tyrannosaurus was large and strong enough to attack the great three-horned Triceratops, one of the most interesting of the Dinosaur family, a fine skeleton which has recently been set up in the National Museum at Washington.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1921, the Eagle reported, “Designation of Crown Prince Hirohito as Regent of Japan follows reports which have been in circulation for about a year that Emperor Yoshihito was in bad physical condition. A dispatch to a Honolulu newspaper in May of last year reported that he had suffered a mental and physical breakdown. Early last month a rumor that he was dead circulated in Tokio, and the imperial household, in denying it at that time, stated that he was so ill it was feared that he could not recover … The regent, who is only 20 years old, had already accomplished a great deal in establishing a more liberal understanding between the Imperial Court and the people of the empire. He has already abandoned the ancient idea of imperial aloofness.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “When elderly, rain-soaked German civilians met American troops working their way into Eschweller, Germany, on Nov. 21, among the Yanks was Maj. Hugh Carey of 60 Rutland Road. The Germans told how the Gestapo had attempted to force them to leave the city, and beat many of them with rifle butts and whips, but they hid in cellars, awaiting the arrival of American troops, according to word received from Major Carey by his family here. Major Carey, 25, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Dennis J. Carey and was born in Brooklyn. He graduated from St. Augustine’s High School and St. John’s University, and was a member of the 101st Cavalry before entering the service. He has three brothers in the service, Lt. Dennis J. Carey, Jr., in the air forces; Lt. John R. Carey, with the army in Alaska; and Lt. Martin Carey of the army transport service.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “The Sheepshead Bay Maritime Service Training Station, largest installation of its type in the world, is slated to be abolished by the Federal Maritime Administration for economy reasons, it was learned today. No date has been set for closing down the station, which trained almost 120,000 merchant seamen for service during World War II and has been operating at budget capacity ever since. Its West Coast equivalent, at Alameda, Cal., will shut down next Monday, however … The Brooklyn training station was opened in December, 1942, and by the end of the war had trained an estimated two-thirds of all seamen manning U.S. merchant ships. Most of them got their first training for the job at the base. There are 215 trainees now taking courses, the limit permitted under present appropriations.”


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